Brigham Young University
Back Physical Education

  

Earlene Durrant, Chair
221 RB, PO Box 22091, (801) 378-6507

College of Physical Education Advisement Center
205 RB, PO Box 22117, (801) 378-3638

Admission to Degree Program

The degree programs in the Department of Physical Education carry special enrollment limitations. Please see the college advisement center for specific details.

Graduation Requirements

To receive a bachelor's degree a student must fill three groups of requirements: (1) general education requirements; (2) university requirements; and (3) major requirements.

General Education Requirements

Please see your college advisement center for information about general education courses you should take to dovetail with your major program.

Languages of Learning

Precollege Math (none to three courses)
(or Math ACT score of at least 22)
0-3.0 hours
First-Year Writing (one course) 3.0
Advanced Writing (one to four courses) 3-8.0
Advanced Languages/Math/Music
(one to four courses)
3-20.0

Liberal Arts Core

Biological Science (one to two courses) 3-6.0
Physical Science (one to two courses) 3-7.0
American Heritage (one to two courses) 3-6.0
Wellness (one to three courses) 1.5-3.0
History of Civilization (two courses) 6.0

Arts and Sciences Electives

Arts and Letters (one course) 3.0
Natural Sciences (one course) 3-4.0
Social and Behavioral Sciences (one course) 3.0

Note 1: For a complete list of courses that will fill each GE category, see the General Education section of the current class schedule.

Note 2: Additional information about general education requirements can be found in the General Education section of the current class schedule or this catalog.

Minimum University Requirements

Religion 14.0
Upper-division hours 40.0
Residency 30.0
Total hours 128.0

Cumulative GPA must be at least 2.0.

Note: See the Graduation section of this catalog for more information.

Major Requirements

Complete the major requirements listed for one of the folowing undergraduate degree programs.

Undergraduate Programs and Degrees

BS Health Promotion
BS Physical Education

Emphases:
Athletic Training
Exercise Physiology
Physical Therapy
Public School Teaching

Minors Coaching and Teaching Physical Education
Elementary Physical Education

For help or information on the undergraduate programs, please see your college advisement center.

Graduate Programs and Degrees

MEd Physical Education
MS Physical Education
EdD Physical Education Administration, Curriculum, and Instruction
PhD Corrective Physical Education and Rehabilitation
PhD Exercise Science/Wellness

For more information See the 1997-98 BYU Graduate Catalog.


BS Health Promotion (59.5-60 hours*)


This major is also offered through the Health Sciences Department.

The Discipline

Health promotion is a departure from the typical U.S. health paradigm in that the focus is on developing the processes of staying healthy rather than on discovering and treating illnesses. Rising health care costs have spurred an interest in keeping people healthy to avoid unnecessary health-related expenses. Health promotion professionals assist individuals and organizations in improving their health-related procedures and policies so that the goals and aspirations of both are more likely to be fulfilled.

Career Opportunities

Health promotion personnel find employment with many organizations committed to health enhancement: business, industry, health clinics and resorts, health maintenance organizations, hospitals, insurance companies, senior citizen groups, and voluntary organizations.

Major Requirements

  1. Maintain a high personal fitness level and follow healthy lifestyle habits.
  2. Be admitted to the program by the Interdisciplinary Health Promotion Committee. Admittance into the health promotion major requires the student to earn an average GPA of 3.0 in PE 297, Zool 261, and Stat 221.
  3. No D credit is allowed in major courses.
  4. A minimum of 15 major hours must be completed in residence at BYU.
  5. Complete the following:
    Hlth 320, 365, 420, 460, 461, 463.
    PE 125, 239, 297, 360, 363, 365, 367, 468.
    Acc 200.
    BusM 300.
    FSN 100.
  6. Select one course from the following:
    Hlth 455.
    PE 451.
  7. Select 4 hours from the following:
    Hlth 599R.
    PE 399R.
  8. Select 15-15.5 hours from the following:
    BusM 340.
    Comms 150.
    CSE 546.
    Dance 336.
    FSN 410.
    Hlth 370, 403R, 431R, 465, 466.
    IP&T 286.
    OrgB 320.
    PE 320, 321, 361, 458.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.


BS Physical Education (64.5 hours*)


The Discipline

This major is a pedagogy (teacher preparation) major that does not result in state teacher certification. Those students interested in teaching in the public schools should select the public school teaching emphasis.

Career Opportunities

Career opportunities are limited without completion of the teaching certification curriculum. Students majoring in this discipline would be prepared for a general master's degree program or entry-level positions in the fitness industry.

Major Requirements

  1. Prior to beginning course work in this major, students must apply for admittance into the Flight Program. The program requires that all students take major courses together as a cohort group. See flight advisor during second semester of sophomore year (221 RB).
  2. Maintain a high personal fitness level and follow healthy lifestyle habits.
  3. No D credit is allowed in the major courses.
  4. A minimum of 15 major hours must be completed in residence at BYU.
  5. Complete the following required general education courses:
    HEPE 129.
    Stat 221.
    Zool 260, 261.
    FamSc 210.
  6. Complete the following core requirements:
    PE 350, 361, 362, 363, 367.
  7. Complete the following:
    PE 206R, 230, 231, 233, 239, 320, 321, 352, 360, 374, 377, 399R, 430, 461, 480.
    Dance 356.
    ScEd 276R.
  8. Select one course from the following:
    PE 330R, 335, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348.
  9. Select 1 hour from the following:
    PE 136, 137, 146, 147, 155.
  10. Demonstrate swimming proficiency: beginning or intermediate swimming; ARC, WSI, or lifeguard training.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.


BS Physical Education: Athletic Training Emphasis (76 hours*)


The Discipline

The study of athletic training appeals to those who would like to work in a field that combines an athletic setting with health and fitness care. A student in athletic training will learn to apply knowledge of human anatomy, exercise physiology, conditioning, nutrition, and therapy in the prevention, immediate care, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries.

Career Opportunities

Career possibilities include working with athletic teams at all levels of competition or in a sports medicine clinical setting or other allied health facilities. NATA certification is required, and an advanced degree is recommended.

Major Requirements

  1. Maintain a high personal fitness level and follow healthy lifestyle habits.
  2. No D credit is allowed in the major courses.
  3. A minimum of 33 hours in the major must be completed in residence at BYU.
  4. Apply for acceptance into the athletic training program. See program director during semester of enrollment in PE 320 for an application form. Admission to the program requires the candidate to meet the following criteria:
    • Complete Zool 260, 261, PE 320, 321.
    • Have a physical examination.
    • Submit two letters of recommendation.
    • Interview with the athletic training staff.
    • Complete 30 hours of clinical observation or experience in a college or high school athletic training setting.
      Admission to the program is limited, competitive, and dependent upon meeting the above criteria. The athletic training staff will make final selection of candidates following the interview. Students must join NATA and pass its examination to certify as an athletic trainer.
  5. Pass the senior interview
  6. Receive CPR certification each year.
  7. Complete the following core courses:
    PE 350, 361, 362, 363, 367.
  8. Complete the following:
    PE 320, 321, 351, 420, 422, 424, 425, 426, 460, 468, 469.
    FSN 410, 459.
    Hlth 320.
    Math 110.
    Mcbio 221.
    Psych 111.
    Stat 221.
    Zool 260, 261.
  9. Complete 2 hours of the following:
    PE 497R.
  10. Complete 8 hours of the following:
    PE 499R.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.


BS Physical Education: Exercise Physiology Emphasis (72.5 hours*)


The Discipline

The exercise physiology/medicine emphasis explores the intriguing relationship between exercise and the functioning of the human body. The basic concepts of human anatomy, physiology, biomechanics, motor learning, chemistry, physics, and nutrition are mastered to help understand this relationship. The impact that movement and exercise have on the human organism is almost interminable, making study of this discipline enthralling.

Students considering medicine as a profession may want to select this major. While providing most requisite courses for medical school acceptance, it also conveys a healthy-lifestyle, preventive-medicine health care perspective.

Career Opportunities

Graduating with an exercise physiology/medicine specialization primarily prepares for work in entry-level positions at research institutions, in corporate wellness centers, in cardiac rehabilitation clinics, and with sports teams. Most vocational opportunities require a master's degree or doctorate and certification by organizations such as the American College of Sports Medicine. Positions requiring only a bachelor's degree will be difficult to find.

Major Requirements

  1. Maintain a high personal fitness level and follow healthy lifestyle habits.
  2. No D credit is allowed in the major courses.
  3. A minimum of 15 hours in the major must be completed in residence at BYU.
  4. Complete the following core courses:
    PE 350, 361, 362, 363, 367.
  5. Complete the following:
    PE 460, 469.
    Mcbio 221, 222.
    Zool 260, 371, 372, 460.
    Chem 105, 106, 107, 351, 352, 353 (1-2 hours).
    Phscs 105, 106, 107, 108.
    FSN 100.
    Stat 221.
    Biol 130.
    Math 119.

Note: Students going to medical school should take 2 hours of Chem 353.

Premed students: Some medical schools require select classes not required by BYU. For more information contact the Health Professions Advisement Office, 380 WIDB, PO Box 25176, (801) 378-3044.

Recommended Courses

PE 320.
Chem 468, 481.
Zool 339 or 439 (premed); 361, 380.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.


BS Physical Education: Physical Therapy Emphasis (75 hours*)


The Discipline

Physical therapy is a dynamic profession for anyone interested in the health care field. To equip students with the skills and knowledge necessary for entry into a physical therapy school and then into the profession of physical therapy, BYU's physical therapy specialization emphasizes the intriguing subjects of exercise science (functional anatomy, patho-kinesiology, athletic injury, exercise physiology, biomechanics, and motor learning), as well as the traditional physical therapy requirements (zoology, chemistry, physics, psychology, and mathematics).

Career Opportunities

The undergraduate degree prepares specifically for entrance into physical therapy school. However, with the prephysical therapy undergraduate degree and a GPA of at least 3.0, entrance into most exercise science graduate programs is possible.

Major Requirements

  1. Maintain a high personal fitness level and follow healthy lifestyle habits.
  2. No D credit is allowed in the major courses.
  3. A minimum of 15 hours in the major must be completed in residence at BYU.
  4. Complete the following core courses:
    PE 350, 361, 362, 363, 367.
  5. Complete the following:
    Biol 130.
    Chem 105, 106, 107.
    Math 119.
    Mcbio 221, 222.
    PE 320, 321, 460, 469.
    Phscs 105, 106, 107, 108.
    Psych 111, 220, 342.
    Stat 222.
    Zool 260, 276, 460.

Note: Some postgraduate schools require select classes not shown above. For more information contact the physical therapy advisement staff (116 RB, [801] 378-3982).

Recommended Courses

Nurs 102.
Hlth 320, 451, 461.
Chem 152, 281, 351, 352, 481.
Comms 150.
Zool 371, 372, 373, 380, 475, 484, 561.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.


BS Physical Education: Public School Teaching Emphasis (85.5 hours,* including certification hours)


The Discipline

Students preparing to teach and/or coach physical education will have a variety of experiences that will enhance proficiency in the knowledge and skills requisite to working in the contemporary school setting. Majors learn to perform a variety of sport, fitness, and dance activities personally. After becoming proficient, students take courses and have practical experiences in teaching and coaching children, adolescents, and adults. The discipline is interesting and rewarding, and those in a teaching/coaching career help others pursue and practice healthy lifestyle habits.

Career Opportunities

Graduates seek teaching and physical education/coaching careers in secondary education settings. With an advanced degree, teaching and coaching positions at institutions of higher learning are available.

It is recommended that students desiring to be optimally employable in secondary schools complete an acceptable teaching minor and American Coaching Effectiveness Program (ACEP) coaching certification.

Major Requirements

  1. Prior to beginning course work in the major, students must apply for admittance into the Flight Program. The program requires that all students take the major courses together as a cohort group. See the flight advisor during second semester of sophomore year (221 RB).
  2. Maintain a high personal fitness level and follow healthy lifestyle habits.
  3. No D credit is allowed in the major courses.
  4. A minimum of 15 hours in the major must be completed in residence at BYU.
  5. Pass the senior interview.
  6. A teaching minor is not required for certification. However, it is strongly recommended.
  7. Complete the following required general education courses:
    FamSc 210.
    HEPE 129.
    Stat 221.
    Zool 260, 261
  8. Complete the following core courses:
    PE 350, 361, 362, 363, 367.
  9. Complete the following:
    PE 206R, 230, 231, 233, 239, 320, 321, 352, 360, 374, 377, 399R, 430, 461, 480.
    Dance 356.
  10. Select one course from the following:
    PE 330R, 335, 341,342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348.
  11. Select 1 hour from the following:
    PE 136, 137, 146, 147, 155.
  12. Demonstrate swimming proficiency: beginning or intermediate swimming; ARC, WSI, or lifeguard training.
  13. Complete the Professional Education Component (27-28 hours): see the Secondary Education section of this catalog for certification requirements.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.


Minor Coaching and Teaching Physical Education (25 hours)


  1. Complete the following:
    PE 229, 234, 237, 320, 321, 351, 364, 365, 366, 399R, 430, 450.
  2. Select one course from the following:
    PE 206R, 207R.
  3. Select one course from the following:
    PE 330R, 335, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348.

Minor Elementary Physical Education (20 hours*)


  1. Be an elementary education major.
  2. Complete the following:
    PE 106, 136, 169, 364, 375, 376.
    Hlth 320.
    Dance 365, 378R, 386.
  3. Select one course from the following:
    PE 146, 181.
  4. Select one course from the following:
    PE 365, 366.
  5. Select one course from the following:
    PE 379, 461.
  6. Select 2 additional hours from physical education courses.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.

Health/Physical Education (HEPE)

Undergraduate Course

129. Fitness and Lifestyle Management. (2:2:1)

Why a healthy lifestyle is needed and how to write individualized programs to meet these needs.

Physical Education (PE)

Class Schedule Major Academic Plan (MAP)

Undergraduate Courses

100R. Intercollegiate Athletics (Men). (0.5:2:10.5 ea.)

101R. Activities for Fitness and Weight Control. (0.5:0:2 ea.)

102R. Adaptive Physical Education. (0.5:0:2 ea.) Prerequisite: medical referral.

103. Archery, Beginning. (0.5:0:2)

106. Badminton, Beginning. (0.5:0:2)

107. Badminton, Intermediate. (0.5:0:2) Prerequisite: PE 106 or equivalent.

111. Basketball, Beginning. (0.5:0:2)

112. Basketball, Intermediate. (0.5:0:2) Prerequisite: PE 111 or equivalent.

116. Bowling, Beginning. (0.5:0:2) Fee.

117. Bowling, Intermediate. (0.5:0:2) Fee.

120. Cycling. (0.5:0:2)

Basic knowledge and skills in cycling and bike maintenance.

121. Diving, Beginning. (0.5:0:2)

122. Diving, Intermediate. (0.5:0:2) Prerequisite: PE 121 or equivalent.

124. (PE-AnSc) Equitation (Horsemanship). (0.5:0:2) Prerequisite: rider weight limit of 200 lbs. or instructor's consent.

Handling, grooming, saddling, and suppling horse and rider. Western and English theory used, emphasizing the independent seat and use of aids. Fee.

125. Flexibility. (0.5:0:2)

126. Fencing, Beginning. (0.5:0:2)

127. Fencing, Intermediate. (0.5:0:2) Prerequisite: PE 126 or equivalent.

129. Fitness for Living. (0.5:0:2) Independent Study also. Prerequisite: concurrent registration in Hlth 129 or 130 or demonstrated understanding of basic health principles.

Correct concepts for cardiovascular endurance, strength, flexibility, and weight control.

131. Golf, Beginning. (0.5:0:2)

132. Golf, Intermediate. (0.5:0:2) Prerequisite: PE 131 or equivalent.

133. Golf, Advanced. (0.5:0:2) Prerequisite: PE 132 or equivalent.

136. Gymnastics, Beginning. (0.5:0:2)

137. Gymnastics, Intermediate. (0.5:0:2) Prerequisite: PE 136 or equivalent.

138. Gymnastics, Advanced. (0.5:0:2) Prerequisite: PE 137 or equivalent.

For advanced gymnasts, men and women; consisting of 30 percent A moves, 40 percent B moves, and 30 percent C moves.

139. Jogging. (0.5:0:2) Independent Study also.

141. Karate, Beginning. (0.5:0:2)

142. Karate, Intermediate. (0.5:0:2)

143R. Physical Training—ROTC. (0.5:0:2 ea.)

For ROTC students only.

146. Racquetball, Beginning. (0.5:0:2)

147. Racquetball, Intermediate. (0.5:0:2)

155. Self-Defense. (0.5:0:2)

Fundamental principles, skills, and techniques.

156. Soccer, Beginning. (0.5:0:2)

157. Soccer, Intermediate. (0.5:0:2) Prerequisite: PE 156 or equivalent.

161. Skiing, Beginning. (0.5:0:5)

Sections formed on basis of ability, with instruction suited to varying skill levels in skiing fundamentals. Student furnishes own ski equipment and pays ski tow fees. Fee. (Permission to withdraw with refund restricted.)

162. Skiing, Intermediate. (0.5:0:5) Fee.

164. Skiing, Cross-Country. (0.5:0:2) Fee.

169. Skill Acquisition and Analysis. (0.5:0:2)

Required for elementary education majors. Meets one university physical education activity requirement.

170. Swimming for Nonswimmers. (0.5:0:2)

171. Swimming, Beginning. (0.5:0:2)

172. Swimming, Intermediate. (0.5:0:2) Independent Study also. Prerequisite: PE 171 or equivalent.

174R. Swimming for Students with Disabilities. (0.5:0:2 ea.)

Can be taken repeatedly to fulfill the university physical education activity requirement for any student with special needs.

176. Rhythmic Swimming. (0.5:0:2)

Swimming to music.

179. Water Aerobics. (0.5:0:2)

Exercise workout in water emphasizing flexibility, strength, and endurance. For nonswimmers and swimmers.

181. Tennis, Beginning. (0.5:0:2)

182. Tennis, Intermediate. (0.5:0:2) Prerequisite: PE 181 or equivalent.

183. Tennis, Advanced. (0.5:0:2) Prerequisite: PE 182 or equivalent.

186. Volleyball, Beginning. (0.5:0:2)

187. Volleyball, Intermediate. (0.5:0:2) Prerequisite: PE 186 or equivalent.

188. Volleyball, Advanced. (0.5:0:2) Prerequisite: PE 187 or equivalent.

191. Weight Training, Beginning. (0.5:0:2)

192. Weight Training, Intermediate. (0.5:0:2) Prerequisite: PE 191 or equivalent.

Theory and technique of maximal strength development, emphasizing “power” and “Olympic” lifts.

196. Wrestling, Beginning. (0.5:0:2)

197. Wrestling, Intermediate. (0.5:0:2) Prerequisite: PE 196 or equivalent.

200R. Intercollegiate Athletics (Women). (0.5:0:3 ea.)

201R. Extramural Sports. (0.5:0:2 ea.)

203R. Performance Psychology. (1:1:1 ea.)

Relaxation and imagery for athletes and performing artists.

206R. Officiating Team Sports. (1:0.5:1.5 ea.)

Rules, techniques, problems, and procedures in officiating football, basketball, volleyball, soccer, softball, or baseball. Suggested for those who wish to officiate in intramural and church programs. National Federation or OSA examinations given.

207R. Officiating Individual Sports. (1:0.5:1.5 ea.)

Rules, techniques, problems, and procedures in officiating men's and women's gymnastics, swimming and diving, racquet sports, track and field, or wrestling.

229. Basic Sport Pedagogy. (2:2:0)

Sport pedagogy for students minoring in physical education/coaching.

230. Sports and Activities 1 (2:0:6) Prerequisite: acceptance into flight program.

Development of mature motor patterns in activities that include soccer, flag football, track and field, volleyball, basketball, and Ultimate Frisbee.

231. Sport and Activities 2. (2:0:6) Prerequisite: acceptance into flight program.

Development of mature motor patterns in activities that include: badminton, tennis, archery, bowling, golf, and recreational games.

233. Lifetime and Leisure Activities. (1:0:3) Prerequisite: acceptance into flight program.

Exposure to and development of skills in contemporary, noncompetitive, lifelong leisure activities.

234. Team Sport Fundamentals. (1:0:4) Prerequisite: PE 229.

Skill and pedagogy development in soccer and volleyball. For minors in physical education/coaching only.

237. Individual Sport Fundamentals. (1:0:4) Prerequisite: PE 229.

Skill and pedagogy development in tennis and weight training. For minors in physical education/coaching only.

239. Weight Training: Skills and Teaching Techniques. (0.5:0:2)

242. Track and Field: Skills and Teaching Techniques. (1:1:3)

276. Water Safety Instructor Training. (2:1:3) Prerequisite: ARC Swimmer-level competency.

Leads to American Red Cross WSI certification. Swimming teaching methods that include teaching swimming to special needs students.

277. Techniques of Lifeguarding. (2:1:3) Prerequisite: swim competency test (given first day of class).

First-aid and lifeguard skills training, including instruction in CPR, and American Red Cross certification for lifeguard training.

297. Introduction to Health Promotion Education. (2:1:3)

Seminars and field trips.

320. Basic Athletic Training. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Zool 260; concurrent registration in PE 321.

Recognition, evaluation, and care of athletic injuries. Techniques in taping, preventing, and rehabilitating injuries.

321. Basic Athletic Training Lab. (0.5:0:0.5) Prerequisite: concurrent registration in PE 320. Fee.

330R. Coaching Selected Sports. (2:1:2 ea.) Prerequisite: appropriate skills and teaching techniques class or equivalent.

Theory, fundamentals, strategies, and techniques of coaching tennis, golf, badminton, archery, soccer, or field hockey.

335. Coaching Competitive Swimming. (2:1:2) Prerequisite: intermediate swimming skills.

Analysis of strokes, starts, turns, and legalities of each.

341. Coaching Basketball. (2:2:1) Prerequisite: PE 230 or equivalent.

342. Coaching Track and Field. (2:1:2) Prerequisite: PE 242R or equivalent.

343. Coaching Gymnastics. (2:1:2) Prerequisite: PE 136 or equivalent.

344. Coaching Football. (2:2:1)

345. Coaching Volleyball. (2:2:1) Prerequisite: PE 230 or equivalent.

346. Coaching Baseball and Softball. (2:2:1) Prerequisite: PE 230 or equivalent.

347. Coaching Soccer. (2:1:2) Prerequisite: PE 156 or equivalent.

Methodology, skills, and strategies of coaching soccer.

348. Coaching Wrestling. (2:1:2) Prerequisite: PE 196 or equivalent.

Some emphasis on managing meets and tournaments.

350. Historical, Philosophical, and Sociological Foundations of Physical Education. (3:3:0)

351. Administration of Athletic and Intramural Programs. (2:2:0) Independent Study also.

Management styles and techniques for interschool athletic and intramural programs; policies concerning eligibility, contest management, safety, facilities, and legal aspects. For prospective coaches, teachers, athletic directors, and athletic trainers.

352. Legal and Administrative Aspects of Physical Education. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: acceptance into flight program.

Principles of physical education and intramural management including facilities, equipment, fiscal matters, personnel, public relations, and program administration. Legal considerations of physical education and sport programs, including constitutional rights, gender, liability, and risk management.

360. Measurement, Evaluation, and Technology. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: PE 363, 367.

Elementary statistical testing and technological tools applicable to physical education. Course meets secondary education technology requirements.

361. Introduction to Motor Learning. (3:2:2)

Motor and cognitive factors influencing acquisition of motor skills.

362. Kinesiology and Biomechanics of Sport. (4:3:2) Prerequisite: Zool 260, Math 99 or equivalent, Phscs 100 or equivalent.

363. Physiology of Activity. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Zool 261 or 460; concurrent registration in PE 367.

364. Scientific Bases of Sport 1: Motor Learning. (2:2:0)

Motor learning principles for physical education/coaching minor.

365. Scientific Bases of Sport 2: Kinesiology. (2:2:0)

Kinesiology and biomechanics for physical education/coaching minor.

366. Scientific Bases of Sport 3: Physiology of Activity. (2:2:0)

Physiology of activity for physical education/coaching minor.

367. Physiology of Activity Lab. (0.5:0:0.5) Prerequisite: concurrent registration in PE 363.

374. Fundamental Skills and Teaching Methods for Elementary Physical Education. (2:1:3) Prerequisite: acceptance into flight program.

Identifying and demonstrating fundamental skills; identifying immature and mature movement patterns; selecting developmentally appropriate activities; appropriate management techniques.

375. Physical Education for Elementary School Teachers. (2:1:3) Prerequisite: PE 169.

376. Practical Experience in Teaching Elementary School Physical Education. (2:0:4) Prerequisite: PE 375.

377. Secondary Practicum. (2:1:2) Prerequisite: acceptance into flight program.

Written and practical teaching assignments designed to help prospective teachers plan, conduct, and evaluate lessons and unit plans appropriate to adolescent students.

379. Physical Education for Special Education Teachers. (2:2:2)

399R. Cooperative Education: Internship. (1-9:0:Arr. ea.) Prerequisite: advisor's consent; PE 297 for health promotion majors.

On-the-job experience for physical education majors and coaching and physical education minors.

420. Advanced Athletic Training. (3:2:2) Prerequisite: PE 320 and 50 hours in training room.

Advanced theory and practical skills in prevention, immediate care, and treatment of injuries.

422. Therapeutic Modalities in Treatment of Athletic Injuries. (3:2:2) Prerequisite: PE 420.

Hydrotherapy, massage, traction, radiant energy, heat, cold, and electrotherapy.

424. Introduction to Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. (2:1:1) Prerequisite: PE 422. For athletic training students.

Orthopaedics of the injured athlete.

425. Examination of Athletic Injuries. (2:2:0) Prerequisite: PE 420.

Examining the injury.

426. Rehabilitation of Athletic Injuries. (2:2:0) Prerequisite: PE 420.

430. Theory of Coaching. (2:2:2)

450. Psychology of Sport. (2:2:0)

451. Management and Implementation of Adult Fitness Programs. (3:3:0)

Teaching and communication strategies.

458. Physical Education—Athletics, Sport, and the Law. (2:2:0)

Detailed analysis of legal liabilities and issues relative to supervising physical education, recreation, and athletic programs.

460. Orthopaedic Impairments and Therapeutic Exercise. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: PE 362; Zool 260 or equivalent.

Fundamentals of body mechanics and therapeutic exercise, coupled with kinesiological principles for detection and correction of basic neuromusculoskeletal anomalies.

461. Teaching Special Populations. (3:2:1) Prerequisite: acceptance into flight program.

Program, legal mandates, management techniques, and assessing and identifying special needs students.

468. Problems in Conditioning. (2:2:0) Prerequisite: PE 363.

Applying scientific principles to problems in conditioning.

469. Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology. (4:3:2) Prerequisite: PE 362, 363, 460, or equivalent.

Study of human anatomy with application of basic kinesiological principles.

476. Elementary Student Teaching in Physical Education. (4:1:7) Prerequisite: completion of courses in public school teaching major and instructor's consent.

480. Curriculum Development in Physical Education. (1:1:0)

Introduction to curriculum models; sequential steps in curriculum design; planning and partial implementation of a physical education curriculum; integration of personal philosophy into curriculum planning.

497R. Undergraduate Research and Study. (1-4:0:Arr. ea.) Prerequisite: PE 422 for athletic training majors and/or instructor's consent.

Individual research and study in any area of physical education.

499R. Practicum. (1-8:0:Arr. ea.) Prerequisite: PE 320, 420, and instructor's consent.

Academic and practical application of skills for athletic trainers.

500-Level Graduate Courses (available to advanced undergraduates)

550. Motor Development and Growth of Children. (2:2:3)

Existing body of knowledge regarding motor development of children and significance of physical activity in early childhood.

560. Orthopaedic Pathomechanics. (2:2:1) Prerequisite: PE 460 or equivalent.

Advanced analysis of neuromusculoskeletal deformities and/or injury. Therapeutic exercise and the use of orthoses.

582. Physical Education for the Mentally Retarded. (2:2:0) Prerequisite: baccalaureate degree in physical education.

Theoretical and practical aspects of teaching mentally retarded child and adult.

586R. Workshop in Fitness and Sport. (1-4:Arr.:Arr. ea.) Prerequisite: undergraduate major in physical education or equivalent.

599R. Practicum. (1-9:0:Arr. ea.) Prerequisite: PE 468 or concurrent registration for conditioning coaches.

Field experience for physical education students; 50 hours of volunteer service in approved organization required per credit hour.

Graduate Courses

For 600- and 700-level courses, See the 1997-98 BYU Graduate Catalog.

Physical Education Faculty

Professors

Allsen, Philip Edmond (1966) BS, Ricks Coll., 1955; MS, Brigham Young U., 1960; EdD, U. of Utah, 1965.

Conlee, Robert K. (1977) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1969, 1970; PhD, U. of Iowa, 1975.

Durrant, Earlene (1973) BS, MS, EdD, Brigham Young U., 1962, 1963, 1975.

Fisher, A. Garth (1969) BS, Brigham Young U., 1955; MA, Sacramento State Coll., 1966; PhD, U. of New Mexico, 1969.

Harrison, Joyce M. (1969) BA, MA, California State U., Long Beach, 1964, 1966; EdD, Brigham Young U., 1973.

Lockhart, Barbara D. (1991) BS, MA, Michigan State U., 1964, 1967; EdD, Brigham Young U., 1971.

McGown, Carl M. (1972) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1963, 1964; PhD, U. of Oregon, 1971.

Tucker, Larry (1988) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1978, 1979; PhD, Southern Illinois U., 1981.

Athletic Professionals

Edwards, R. LaVell (1962) BS, Utah State U., 1952; MS, U. of Utah, 1960; EdD, Brigham Young U., 1978.

Michaelis, Elaine (1960) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1960, 1962.

Poole, R. Craig (1980) BS, MS, Utah State U., 1964, 1967; EdD, U. of Utah, 1970.

Stiggins, Charles (1978) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1977, 1978.

Valentine, Ann (1966) BS, Slippery Rock State Coll., 1955; MS, Pennsylvania State U., 1961.

Witbeck, Alan R. (1955) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1952, 1954.

Associate Professors

Barker, Ruel M. (1971) BS, Utah State U., 1961; MS, EdD, Brigham Young U., 1964, 1971.

Blakemore, Connie L. (1978) BS, U. of Utah, 1960; MS, Brigham Young U., 1967; EdD, Temple U., 1984.

Clarke, Mark S. (1982) BS, U. of Arizona, 1963; MS, EdD, Brigham Young U., 1964, 1971.

Draper, David (1992) BS, Utah State U., 1982; MA, Brigham Young U., 1984; EdD, Northern Illinois U., 1988.

Hall, Larry Thomas (1978) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1970, 1971; PhD, U. of Utah, 1976.

Leishman, Courtney M. (1962) BS, Utah State U., 1958; MS, EdD, Brigham Young U., 1962, 1976.

Lewis, Kathryn (1972) BS, Brigham Young U., 1955; MA, Long Beach State Coll., 1962; EdD, Brigham Young U., 1978.

Myrer, William (1990) BS, U. of Calgary, Canada, 1974; MA, U. of Windsor, Canada, 1977; PhD, Brigham Young U., 1983.

Ricard, Mark (1994) BS, U. of Vermont, 1978; MAT, Southeast Missouri State U., 1982; PhD, Southern Illinois U., 1986.

Silvester, L. Jay (1969) BS, MS, Utah State U., 1959, 1970; EdD, Brigham Young U., 1976.

Associate Teaching Professional

Chamberlain, Diane (1969) BA, California State U., Los Angeles, 1966; MS, Brigham Young U., 1969; EdD, U. of Utah, 1984.

Associate Athletic Professionals

Chow, Norman Y. H. (1976) BS, MS, U. of Utah, 1968, 1970; EdD, Brigham Young U., 1978.

Olson, Mel J. (1970) BS, MA, EdD, Brigham Young U., 1970, 1973, 1980.

Assistant Professors

Aldana, Steve (1994) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1986, 1988; PhD, Arizona State U., 1991.

George, Jim (1995) BS, MA, Brigham Young U., 1984, 1986; PhD, Arizona State U., 1995.

Hawkes, Nena Rey (1960) BS, Utah State U., 1954; MS, Brigham Young U., 1965; PhD, Union Institute, 1993.

Schulthies, Shane S. (1991) BS, Brigham Young U., 1987; MS, Texas Woman's U., 1989; PhD, Brigham Young U., 1991.

Wilkinson, Carol (1995) BEd, Durham U., England, 1976; MS, EdD, Brigham Young U., 1981, 1983.

Zanandrea, Maria (1995) BA, MS, EdD, Brigham Young U., 1983, 1985, 1992.

Assistant Athletic Professionals

Brockbank, Bruce (1992) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1990, 1992.

French, Roger W. (1980) BS, U. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 1956; MA, Memphis State U., 1958.

Howard, Gary Ray (1975) BS, MRE, Brigham Young U., 1967, 1970.

Julkunen, A. Olavi (1975) BS, Brigham Young U., 1971.

Lamb, Barry (1994) BS, U. of Oregon, 1978; MA, Arizona State U., 1988.

Merrill, R. Gaye (1981) BS, Brigham Young U., 1978; MS, Indiana U., Bloomington, 1979.

Noel, Robert Edward (1979) BS, Brigham Young U., 1964.

Powers, Timothy J. (1975) BS, U. of Montana, 1968; MA, San Jose State U., 1973.

Pullins, Gary D. (1976) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1969, 1975.

Ramage, Thomas J. (1973) BS, MS, Utah State U., 1957, 1962.

Reid, Roger L. (1978) BS, Weber State Coll., 1968.

Russell, Keith (1992) BS, Brigham Young U., 1973.

Sakamoto, Makato (1988) BS, U. of Southern California, 1970; MA, U. of California, Los Angeles, 1980.

Schmidt, Kenneth (1983) BS, MS, U. of Utah, 1964, 1969.

Shane, Patrick (1985) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1968, 1970.

Athletic Coaches

Adams, Soni (1994) BS, U. of Utah, 1981; MS, Eastern Washington U., 1990.

Bosco, Robbie (1990) BS, MA, Brigham Young U., 1985, 1989.

Curtis, George (1985) BS, Southern Utah State Coll., 1971.

Ingle, Tony (1989) BA, Huntingdon Coll., 1976; MS, North Georgia Coll., 1980.

Pella, Chris (1986) BS, Utah State U., 1966.

Pincock, Stephen (1993) BS, Brigham Young U., 1990.

Reynolds, Lance (1983) BS, Brigham Young, U., 1980.

Walker, DeWayne M. (1994) AA, Pasadena City Coll., 1980; BA, Regents Coll., 1992.

Emeriti

Bangerter, Blauer L. (1953) BA, Brigham Young U., 1951; MS, PhD, U. of Utah, 1955, 1964.

Bestor, Rollie R. (1969) BS, MS, U. of Wisconsin, Madison, 1954, 1958; EdD, Brigham Young U., 1969.

Bunker, Robert E. (1949) BS, Utah State U., 1937.

Call, C. Boyd (1960) BS, U. of Utah, 1950; MS, Brigham Young U., 1963; PhD, U. of Oregon, 1967.

Cryer, Walter (1964) BS, MS, U. of Illinois Medical, 1952, 1959; EdD, Brigham Young U., 1975.

Felt, Richard G. (1967) BS, MA, Brigham Young U., 1958, 1980.

Francis, Rulon S. (1963) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1952, 1967; PhD, U. of Utah, 1971.

Hirst, Cyntha C. (1948) BA, U. of Utah, 1947; MS, U. of Washington, 1952; PhD, U. of Utah, 1974.

Jarman, Boyd O. (1969) BS, Brigham Young U., 1954; MS, EdD, U. of Oregon, 1959, 1965.

Jensen, Clayne R. (1964) BS, MS, U. of Utah, 1952, 1956; EdD, Indiana U., Bloomington, 1963.

Jones, J. Richard (1961) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1951, 1955; EdD, U. of Northern Colorado, 1967.

Kimball, C. Rodney (1947) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1955, 1963.

Millet, W. Floyd (1963) BA, Brigham Young U., 1934; MS, U. of Southern California, 1939.

Roundy, Elmo S. (1963) BS, MEd, Brigham Young U., 1953, 1956; EdD, U. of California, Los Angeles, 1965.

Tucker, Karl L. (1961) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1952, 1964.

Vickers, Betty J. (1971) BS, Kent State U., 1955; MA, California State U., Los Angeles, 1960; EdD, Brigham Young U., 1976.

Wallace, Lu (1956) BS, Utah State U., 1954; MS, Washington State U., 1960.

Watts, Stanley H. (1947) BS, Brigham Young U., 1938.




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