Brigham Young University
Back Electrical and Computer Engineering

   

Richard L. Frost, Chair
459 CB, PO Box 24099, (801) 378-4012

College of Engineering and Technology Advisement Center
264 CB, PO Box 24101, (801) 378-4325

Admission to Degree Program

The degree programs in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering carry special enrollment limitations. Please see the college advisement center for specific details.

The Discipline

Electrical and computer engineers study phenomena, devices, and systems for information processing, communication, and systems control. These studies, grounded primarily in physics and mathematics, have enabled engineers to develop the innovative new technologies for information acquisition, processing, storage, and communication that have made possible our contemporary Age of Information.

Examples of systems developed by electrical and computer engineers include radio, television, radar, satellite communication systems, cellular telephones, laptop computers, fiber-optic communications devices, global and local computer networks, robotic systems, control systems, fax machines, medical image processing, computer modems, lasers, pagers, computer vision, programmable calculators, VLSI chips, computer-aided design tools, and medical instruments.
Although it is the goal of engineering to produce useful objects, electrical and computer engineers typically play a limited role in construction, assembly, or mass production. Instead, they focus on design, analysis, and the development of the underlying theory and knowledge applied in the design process.

Career Opportunities

Electrical and computer engineers are among the most actively recruited students graduating from a four-year program. Baccalaureate engineers typically start their careers as members of project teams with one or more of the following responsibilities: designing digital, analog, or opto-electronic circuits; creating or testing application-specific software; testing components or systems; or providing technical support for sales. Later on many engineers find themselves pursuing managerial careers, starting their own companies, or even managing entrepreneurial funds. Top graduates are also well received by medical schools, law schools, and professional and management programs.

The BS curriculum for both the electrical engineering and computer engineering degrees is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc. (ABET).

Graduation Requirements

To receive a bachelor's degree a student must fill three groups of requirements: (1) general education requirements; (2) university requirements; and (3) major requirements.

General Education Requirements

Please see your college advisement center for information about general education courses you should take to dovetail with your major program.

Languages of Learning

Precollege Math (zero to one course)
(or Math ACT score of at least 22)
0–3.0 hours
First-Year Writing (one course) 3.0
Advanced Writing (one to four courses) 3–8.0
Advanced Languages/Math/Music
(one to four courses)
3–20.0

Liberal Arts Core

Biological Science (one to two courses) 3–6.0
Physical Science (one to two courses) 3–7.0
American Heritage (one to two courses) 3–6.0
Wellness (one to three courses) 1.5–3.0
Civilization (two courses) 6.0

Arts and Sciences Electives

Arts and Letters (one course) 3.0
Natural Sciences (one course) 3–4.0
Social and Behavioral Sciences (one course) 3.0

Note 1: For a complete list of courses that will fill each GE category, see the General Education section of the current class schedule.

Note 2: Additional information about general education requirements can be found in the General Education section of the current class schedule or this catalog.

Minimum University Requirements

Religion 14.0
Upper-division hours 40.0
Residency 30.0
Total hours 128.0

Cumulative GPA must be at least 2.0.

Note: See the Graduation section of this catalog for more information.

Major Requirements

Complete the major requirements listed for one of the folowing undergraduate degree programs.

Undergraduate Programs and Degrees

BS Computer Engineering
BS Electrical Engineering
Emphasis (optional):
International

For help or information on the undergraduate programs, please see your college advisement center.

Students interested in pursuing honors for the electrical engineering program should consult with the college advisement center.

Graduate Programs and Degrees

MS Electrical Engineering
PhD Electrical Engineering

For more information see the 1998-99 BYU Graduate Catalog.



General Information

Preprofessional Program. All students who declare electrical and computer engineering as a major will be designated preprofessional until an application for acceptance to the professional program (available at the college advisement center, 264 CB) has been considered and approved by the department's professional admissions committee. Preprofessional students are not allowed to enroll in electrical and computer engineering technical courses numbered 300 or above.

Academic Standards and Continuance. Proficiency in electrical and computer engineering requires dedication and certain natural abilities. It is the expectation of the department that all students accepted to the professional program have already demonstrated these qualities and will possess the abilities to successfully complete the program. Progress will be measured against professional standards.

Demonstrated integrity and a willingness to honor the highest professional standards of the engineering profession are expected.
From all technical classes being taken at the time of and after acceptance into the professional program, the student is (1) required to maintain a cumulative technical GPA of at least 2.0 and (2) permitted one technical class with an original substandard grade. If the substandard grade is at least a D– and the course is not prerequisite to a required course, credit will be given for graduation. For this discussion, the GPA computed from all technical classes, except for laboratory and seminar classes but including repeats, is called a technical GPA. An “original substandard grade” is defined as an E, UW, D, or unconverted I whether or not the course is later repeated and a higher grade received.
Permanent probationary status is automatically given at the end of the semester or term to any student whose grades fall below the bounds set above. A reasonable effort will be made to notify the student by letter at the address listed by the university. Should this fail, the student is still responsible for his probationary status.
After having been sent a letter indicating that he or she is on probation, the student is suspended from the department (1) by receiving additional original substandard grades or (2) by failing to increase his or her technical GPA to 2.0 or higher after one semester of being on probationary status. In extreme cases the student, together with the departmental standards committee, may prearrange to extend the one-semester probation period with which to increase his or her technical GPA. Appeals will be considered by the departmental standards committee.

Professional Registration. The Electrical and Computer Engineering Department provides the option for graduates to become registered professional engineers. General qualifications for becoming registered are explained in the College of Engineering and Technology section of this catalog. This status is vital to engineering practice in the public sector and to much consulting work. The basic electrical and computer engineering program outlined in this department prepares graduates to successfully complete the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination. Students who wish to become registered as professional engineers are advised to discuss this matter with an advisor from the department soon after admission to the professional program.



BS Computer Engineering (93-96 hours*)

Major Requirements

  1. Complete the following preprofessional program as soon as possible upon entering BYU:
    • Select at least 3 hours (other than Engl 316) from item 2 below.

    • Complete the following (or approved equivalent courses):
      ECEn 191.
      Math 112, 113.
      Phscs 121, 122.

      Note: Although ECEn 191 is not required before application for professional status, take it as early as possible.

    • During the semester of completing the above, obtain an application from the college advisement center and apply for professional status. (Contact the department or the college advisement center for additional details).

  2. Complete the following supporting courses (either as a preprofessional or a professional student):
    • Complete the following:
      Chem 105.
      CS 142.
      ECEn 220, 491.
      Engl 316.
      Phscs 281.
      Stat 421.

    • Select one of the following sequences:
      1. For the standard math sequence, complete the following:
        Math 312, 313.

      2. For the optional math sequence, complete the following:
        Math 343, 344, 434.

        Note: The optional math sequence is recommended for honors students and those seeking an advanced degree or a minor in mathematics.

  3. Complete the following professional requirements:
    • Complete the following:
      ECEn 311, 312, 313, 317, 325, 425, 427, 451, 492A,B,C.
      CS 235, 240, 345.

    • Select one course from the following:
      MeEn 321, 401.

    • Select one course from the following:
      CS 428, 431, 452, 453, 455, 456, 470.

    • Select one course from the following:
      ECEn 315, 360, 450.

    • Select courses from the list below so the credit hours from items d and e total at least 9 (at least 8 hours with a mathematics minor):
      Math 323, 332, 411.
      Phscs 471, 561.
      Selected 400- and 500-level computer science courses.
      Any 300-level ECEn course except 301R.
      Any 400- or 500-level ECEn course.

Note: Contact the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department for current information about added and/or deleted courses, as well as information about when courses are offered.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



BS Electrical Engineering (94-97 hours*)

Major Requirements

  1. Complete the following preprofessional program as soon as possible upon entering BYU:
    • Complete at least 3 hours (other than Engl 316) from item 2 below.

    • Complete the following (or approved equivalent courses):
      ECEn 191.
      Math 112, 113.
      Phscs 121, 122.

      Note: Although ECEn 191 is not required before application for professional status, take it as early as possible.

    • During the semester of completing the above, obtain an application from the college advisement center and apply for professional status. (Contact the department or the college advisement center for additional details).

  2. Complete the following supporting courses (either as a preprofessional or a professional student):
    • Complete the following:
      Chem 105.
      CS 142.
      ECEn 220, 491.
      Engl 316.
      Phscs 281.
      Stat 421.

    • Complete one of the following sequences:
      1. For the standard math sequence, complete the following:
        Math 312, 313.

      2. For the optional math sequence, complete the following:
        Math 343, 344, 434.

        Note: The optional math sequence is recommended for honors students and those seeking an advanced degree.

  3. Complete the following professional requirements:
    • Complete the following:
      ECEn 311, 312, 313, 315, 316, 317, 325, 360, 361, 492A,B,C.

    • Select one course from the following:
      MeEn 321, 401.

  4. Complete the following advanced program and technical electives (24 hours for the standard mathematics sequence, 23 hours for the optional mathematics sequence):
    • Complete at least 14 hours from the advanced 400-level courses (450 and 452, 460 and 461 must be taken as pairs):
      ECEn 411, 415, 425, 443, 444, 450, 451, 452, 460, 461.

    • Select 9–10 hours of technical elective courses from the following:
      1. Additional courses from item 4a above.

      2. ECEn 427 or any 500-level course.

      3. Selected 300-level and higher courses in mechanical engineering, civil and environmental engineering, mathematics, physics, and/or computer science as posted in the department office.

Note: Contact the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department for current information about added and/or deleted courses, as well as information about when courses are offered.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



Emphasis (optional): International (101.5-106.5 hours*)

Emphasis Requirements

  1. Complete the requirements for the electrical engineering program as outlined above.

  2. Complete the following additional courses:
    EngT 200, 498.
    BusM 430.

  3. Select one course from the following:
    RelC 344, 351, 355, 356.

  4. In consultation with the college advisement center, select a foreign literature course or a classical civilization course.

    Or select one course from the following:

    FnArt 270R.
    Hist 312.
    Hum 240, 242.
    Music 203.
    Fren/Ital 217.
    VAHis 260.

  5. An international “live-in” experience is required. It may be satisfied by (1) a semester or term work experience in a foreign country, (2) a semester or term Study Abroad program approved by the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies and college personnel, or (3) a prior living experience, such as a foreign mission.

  6. Write a senior paper.

Recommended

Proficiency in a foreign language is strongly suggested.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



Electrical and Computer Engineering (EC En)

Class Schedule Major Academic Plan (MAP)

Undergraduate Courses

191. Freshman Seminar. (0.5:1:0) F, W

Presentations by faculty and advisors, including design projects. College Lecture attendance required.

199R. Cooperative Education. (1–3:Arr.:Arr. ea.) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: department chair's and cooperative education coordinator's consent.

Work experience evaluated by supervisor and posted on student's transcript.

220. Digital State Machines. (4:3:5) F, W, Su Prerequisite: Phscs 122 or concurrent registration.

Basic elements and technologies used to make digital logic circuits; laboratory experience in construction of synchronous and asynchronous state machines. Fee.

301R. Elements of Electrical Engineering. (1–3:3:1 ea.) F, W, Sp Prerequisite: Phscs 122, Math 313.

Linear electrical circuits, computer organization, and logic circuits for nonmajors.

311. Circuits Laboratory. (1:0:3) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: EcEn. 312 or concurrent registration.

Basic electrical instrumentation and measurements. Fee.

312. Circuit Analysis. (4:4:2) F, W, Sp Prerequisite: Phscs 122, Math 113, professional status.

Analysis of resistive circuits and RLC circuits in the sinusoidal-steady-state, resonance, Bode plots, and balanced three-phase circuits. To be taken semester of admittance to professional program.

313. Electronic Circuit Design 1. (4:4:2) F, W, Sp Prerequisite: ECEn 311, 312.

Analysis and design of linear and nonlinear electronic circuit building blocks.

315. Signals and Systems. (4:4:2) F, W, Sp Prerequisite: ECEn 312, Math 313 or 434.

Time and frequency domain analysis of discrete or continuous systems subjected to periodic or nonperiodic input signals.

316. Signals and Systems Laboratory. (1:0:3) F, W, Sp Prerequisite: ECEn 315 or concurrent registration.

Computer simulation of continuous and discrete systems in both the time and frequency domains.

317. Electronics Laboratory 1. (1:0:3) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: ECEn 313 or concurrent registration.

Measurement and design of basic electronic building blocks.

325. Introduction to Computer Design with Applications. (5:4:3) F, W Prerequisite: ECEn 220; CS 142 or equivalent.

Computer design, organization, architecture, and interfacing. Architectural trade-offs between hardware and software. Machine-level programming.

360. Transmission Lines and Introductory Fields. (4:4:2) F, W Prerequisite: Math 312 or 344, 313 or 434, ECEn 312.

Properties and application of transmission lines. Introduction to electric and magnetic field theory and development of Maxwell's equations.

361. Transmission Lines and Introductory Fields Laboratory. (1:0:3) F, W Prerequisite: ECEn 360 or concurrent registration.

Experiments and measurement techniques in static and time-varying fields. Transmission line design and measurements. Microwave generation, propagation, detection, and hardware components.

411. Feedback Concepts. (3:3:1) F, Sp Prerequisite: ECEn 315.

Introduction to design and analysis of continuous systems controlled by feedback.

415. Introduction to Discrete-Time Signal Processing. (3:3:1) W Prerequisite: ECEn 315.

DSP, fast Fourier transforms, digital filter design, spectrum analysis, applications in speech processing, SONAR communications, etc.

425. Computer Architecture with Applications. (4:3:4) F, W Prerequisite: ECEn 325 and C programming experience.

Advanced computer organization, function; modern computer systems design with applications. Hardware/software interface considerations: instruction set design, compilers, operating systems, caches, virtual memory.

427. Computer Input/Output Devices. (3:3:2) F, W Prerequisite: ECEn 313, 325.

Input/output interfacing of peripheral devices. Dynamic memory control; disk and graphics controllers. Computer communications; error control coding with finite fields. Selected laboratory assignments.

443. Electronic Circuit Design 2. (4:3:5) W Prerequisite: ECEn 313, 317.

Design of electronic circuits, such as multistage, power, feedback, and high frequency amplifiers, oscillators, modulators, and power supplies.

444. Analog and Digital Communication Theory. (3:3:1) F, W Prerequisite: ECEn 315, Stat 421.

Analysis and theory of communication systems, emphasizing modulation schemes and applications; information theory; introduction to nondeterministic random signals and processes in the presence of noise.

450. Introduction to Semiconductor Devices. (3:3:1) W Prerequisite: ECEn 313.

Physics of electronic and optical solid state devices; includes semiconductor materials, bipolar and FET device physics and modeling, optical properties of semiconductors, and lasers.

451. Introduction to Digital VLSI Circuits. (4:3:5) F, Sp Prerequisite: ECEn 313, 325.

Design of very large-scale integrated circuits for digital systems. CAD tools used extensively to simulate the design and create and verify mask circuits.

452. Experiments in Integrated Circuit Development. (1:0:3) W Prerequisite: ECEn 450 or concurrent registration.

Measurements of key silicon properties and fabrication of integrated circuits.

460. Applied Electromagnetic Theory. (3:3:1) F Prerequisite: ECEn 360.

Application of Maxwell's equations to propagating and radiating components and systems.

461. Electromagnetics Laboratory. (1:0:3) F Prerequisite: ECEn 361; 460 or concurrent registration.

Design and evaluation of microwave devices, systems, and materials.

491. Senior Seminar. (0.5:2:0) F Prerequisite: senior electrical and computer engineering standing.

Department seminars and College Lecture attendance required.

492A. Senior Seminar and Design Project Proposal. (0.5:1:0) F, W Prerequisite: senior electrical and computer engineering standing; Engl 316 or concurrent registration.

Senior seminar and proposal for senior capstone design project. College Lecture attendance required.

492B. Senior Design Project. (1:0:Arr.) F, W, Sp Prerequisite: ECEn 492A.

Senior design project implementation.

492C. Senior Seminar and Design Project Report. (0.5:0:Arr.) F, W, Sp Prerequisite: ECEn 492B or concurrent registration.

Report and presentation of senior design project. College Lecture attendance required.

493R. Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering. (1–4:Arr.:Arr. ea.) F, W, Sp, Su

Topics vary. Recent developments in electrical and computer engineering.

499A. Honors Thesis Project. (2:0:Arr.) F, W, Sp Prerequisite: ECEn 492A.

Honors senior design project implementation.

499B. Honors Thesis Report. (1:0:Arr.) F, W, Sp Prerequisite: ECEn 499A or concurrent registration.

Report and presentation of honors senior design project.

500-Level Graduate Courses (available to advanced undergraduates)

510. (ECEn-Stat 545) Stochastic Processes. (3:3:0) F Prerequisite: Stat 441.

Review of elementary probability: expectation, characteristic functions, limit theorems. Introductory random processes: definitions and properties, covarience and spectral density, time average, stationarity, ergodicity, linear system relations, mean square estimation, Markov processes.

511. Introduction to Linear System Theory. (3:3:0) W Prerequisite: ECEn 411.

Finite-dimensional linear systems. State variable realizations, canonical forms, controllability, observability, minimality. Time and frequency domain design of controllers and observers.

512. Active and Passive Filter Design. (3:3:0) F Prerequisite: ECEn 315.

Design and frequency response characteristics of active and passive filters; emphasizes applications to signal processing.

517. Digital Filters and Signal Processing. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: ECEn 415, 510, or equivalent.

Digital filters and their application to signal processing.

519. Digital Image Processing. (3:3:0) F Prerequisite: ECEn 415, 510, or equivalent.

Digital processing techniques for two-dimensional scene analysis, classification feature enhancement, contrast enhancement deblurring, data compression, etc.

520. Error-Control Codes. (3:3:0) W Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing.

Theory and implimentation of error-control techniques for digital communication, computer, and storage systems. Includes block, cyclic, and convolutional codes.

522R. Special Topics in Computer Systems. (1–3:Arr.:Arr. ea.) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: instructor's consent.

523. Computer Network Queueing. (3:3:0) F Prerequisite: ECEn 315 or concurrent registration; Stat 421.

Queueing concepts related to computer systems and networks, resource allocation, speed, service time. Applications of random variables and probability theory.

526. Local Computer Networks. (3:3:0) W Prerequisite: ECEn 427 or instructor's consent.

Local computer network coupling fundamentals.

528. Computer Systems Architecture. (3:3:0) F Prerequisite: ECEn 425.

Advanced topics in computer architecture and parallel processing.

529. Advanced Computer System Design Lab. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: ECEn 425, 451.

Lab experience in design and analysis of advanced computer systems.

540. Detection and Estimation Theory. (3:3:0) F Prerequisite: concurrent registration in ECEn 510.

Sufficiency, completeness; Neyman Pearson and Bayes detectors; maximum likelihood, Bayes, minimum mean square, and linear estimation; Kalman filters.

542R. Special Topics in Electronics. (1–3:Arr.:Arr. ea.) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: instructor's consent.

544. Digital Communication Theory. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: ECEn 444, 510.

Theory and design of optimal digital communication systems with noise, matched filters, correlation detectors, convolution codes, sequential coding/decoding schemes, block coding, and spread spectrum.

545. Information and Coding Theory. (3:3:0) W Prerequisite: ECEn 315, Stat 421.

Mathematical development of information and coding theory applied to communication and other stochastic processes.

546. Optical Communication Components and Systems. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: ECEn 460.

Fiber optic communication system components and their operating and performance characteristics.

547. Satellite Communications Systems. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: ECEn 444.

Satellite communication system design including satellite transponders, microwave components, earth station hardware, link budgets, and analog and digital modulation formats.

550. Device Electronics for Integrated Circuits. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: ECEn 450.

Semiconductor device analysis and simulation. Analog-integrated circuit design.

551. VLSI Systems Design. (3:3:0) W Prerequisite: ECEn 451.

Design of structured circuit systems for very large-scale integrated semiconductor chips. Architecture of digital VLSI systems.

553. VLSI Process Technology. (3:3:0) F Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in engineering or physical sciences.

Physical and chemical process steps used in fabricating very large-scale integrated circuits on monolithic silicon crystal.

555. VLSI Testing. (1:1:3) F, W Prerequisite: ECEn 451.

Testing of ICs designed previous semester in ECEn 451. Topics in VLSI-testable circuit designs.

560. Intermediate Electromagnetic Theory. (3:3:0) W Prerequisite: ECEn 460. Recommended: Math 323.

Application of electromagnetic theory to nonlinear and anisotropic materials and devices. Current mathematical techniques in field theory.

561. High-Frequency Communication Circuits. (4:4:3) W Prerequisite: ECEn 360, 443.

Circuits and RF techniques used in communication systems.

563. Antenna Theory. (3:3:0) Alt. even yr. Prerequisite: ECEn 460.

Radiation, terminal, and distributed properties of antenna structures. Effects of lossy and ionized media on antenna performance. Noise temperature.

564. Radar Systems Performance. (3:3:0) W Prerequisite: ECEn 444 or 510.

Performance and evaluation of various radar systems. Range equation, signal detection, ambiguity function, system configurations, and components.

568. Microwave Remote Sensing. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: instructor's consent.

Emphasis on space-borne remote sensing of the earth's atmosphere, land, and oceans. Primary methods and applications for both active (radar) and passive (radiometry).

592R. Supervised Teaching Experience. (1–3:Arr.:Arr. ea.)

For students receiving supervised teaching experience.

593R. Special Topics in Electrical Engineering. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: instructor's consent.

Topics vary. Recent developments in electrical engineering.

598R. Special Problems. (1–3:Arr.:Arr. ea.) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: instructor's consent.

Graduate Courses

For 600- and 700-level courses, see the 1998-99 BYU Graduate Catalog.



Electrical and Computer Engineering Faculty

Professors

Chabries, Douglas M. (1978) BS, U. of Utah, 1966; MS, California Inst. of Technology, 1967; PhD, Brown U., 1970.

Christiansen, Richard W. (1978) BS, Rutgers U., 1961; MS, U. of New Mexico, 1966; PhD, U. of Utah, 1976.

Comer, David J. (1981) BSEE, San Jose State U., 1961; MSEE, U. of California, Berkeley, 1962; PhD, Washington State U., 1966.

Comer, Donald T. (1995) BS, San Jose State U., 1959; MS, U. of California, Berkeley, 1961; PhD, U. of Santa Clara, 1968.

Nelson, Brent E. (1984) BS, MS, PhD, U. of Utah, 1981, 1983, 1984.

Stirling, Wynn C. (1984) BS, MS, U. of Utah, 1969, 1971; PhD, Stanford U., 1983.

Associate Professors

Archibald, James K. (1987) BS, Brigham Young U., 1981; MS, PhD, U. of Washington, 1983, 1987.

Bearnson, Leroy W. (1972) BS, U. of Utah, 1961; MS, Syracuse U., 1965; PhD, Auburn U., 1970.

Frost, Richard L. (1987) BS, MS, PhD, U. of Utah, 1975, 1977, 1979.

Hutchings, Brad (1992) BS, MS, PhD, U. of Utah, 1984, 1987, 1992.

Jeffs, Brian D. (1990) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1978, 1982; PhD, U. of Southern California, 1989.

Long, David G. (1990) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1982, 1983; PhD, U. of Southern California, 1989.

Rice, Michael D. (1991) BS, Louisiana Tech U., 1987; MS, PhD, Georgia Inst. of Technology, 1989, 1991.

Salmon, Linton G. (1990) BS, Stanford U., 1977; MS, PhD, Cornell U., 1979, 1983.

Selfridge, Richard H. (1987) BS, California State U., Sacramento, 1978; MS, PhD, U. of California, Davis, 1980, 1984.

Swindlehurst, A. Lee (1990) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1985, 1986; PhD, Stanford U., 1990.

Wilde, Doran (1995) BS, Brigham Young U., 1978; MS, PhD, Oregon State U., 1993, 1995.

Assistant Professors

Arnold, David V. (1992) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1983, 1987; PhD, Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 1992.

Beard, Randal W. (1996) BS, U. of Utah, 1991; MS, PhD, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1993, 1995.

Jensen, Michael (1994) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1990, 1991; PhD, U. of California, Los Angeles, 1994.

Adjunct Faculty

Lawton, Robert A., BS, Brigham Young U., 1960; MS, PhD, U. of Colorado, 1968, 1972.

Rose, Darrell E., BS, Brigham Young U., 1960; MS, Southern Illinois U., 1961; PhD, U. of Oklahoma, 1965.

Emeriti

Berrett, Paul O. (1964) BS, U. of Utah, 1953; MS, U. of Southern California, 1955; PhD, U. of Utah, 1965.

Bowman, Lawrence S. (1967) BS, MS, PhD, U. of Utah, 1957, 1961, 1964.

Chaston, A. Norton (1957) AS, U. of Idaho, 1944; BS, U. of Utah, 1951; MS, Brigham Young U., 1963.

Clegg, John C. (1961) BS, MS, PhD, U. of Utah, 1949, 1954, 1957.

Humpherys, Deverl S. (1964) BS, Brigham Young U., 1955; MS, U. of Utah, 1957; PhD, U. of Illinois, 1963.

Jonsson, Jens J. (1953) BS, BS, U. of Utah, 1944, 1947; MS, PhD, Purdue U., 1948, 1951.

Losee, Ferril A. (1965) BS, U. of Utah, 1953; MS, U. of Southern California, 1957.

Miner, Gayle F. (1960) BS, MS, U. of Utah, 1959, 1960; PhD, U. of California, Berkeley, 1969.

Ward, David M. (1964) BS, Stanford U., 1959.

Woodbury, Richard C. (1959) BS, U. of Utah, 1956; MS, PhD, Stanford U., 1958, 1965.






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