UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2001–2002
Brigham Young University
Back Chemistry and Biochemistry

   

Francis R. Nordmeyer, Chair
C-104 BNSN, (801) 378-6269

College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences Advisement Center
N-179 ESC, (801) 378-6270

Admission to Degree Program

All degree programs in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry are open enrollment. However, special limitations apply for teaching majors.

The Discipline

Chemistry is the study of matter, the changes undergone by matter, and the laws that govern the changes. Chemists study atoms as well as the structures and reactions of molecules. They also work to develop simplifying models (theories) that permit the correlation and explanation of observations about matter. Chemical principles are fundamental to the understanding of subjects ranging from the molecular basis of biology to the structure of rocks and minerals. Chemistry is an essential foundation in engineering disciplines, especially in chemical engineering, the electronics field, energy and environmental science, geology, pharmacy and medicine, and in virtually all manufacturing areas.

Chemistry is an active science that is vital to human existence. Energy needs, environmental concerns, and requirements for new materials all involve major contributions from chemists. Examples of the diverse areas of interest to chemists include gene splicing and DNA replication (biochemistry), synthesis of medicinal substances (organic chemistry), study of complex ions and radicals (inorganic chemistry), spectroscopic study of energy levels and molecular structures (physical chemistry), and analysis of contaminants or trace elements found in the atmosphere or the ocean (analytical chemistry).

Chemistry involves more than test tubes and beakers. It includes working with a variety of equipment and instruments such as mass spectrometers, calorimeters, chromatographs, ultracentrifuges, lasers, X-ray diffractometers, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers.

Career Opportunities

Graduates in chemistry obtain positions in virtually every industry, and those who have imagination and intellectual curiosity are in particular demand. Chemistry is also an excellent preprofessional course of study for those interested in medicine, dentistry, law, and business. The chemistry curriculum is both rigorous and intellectually rewarding.

Graduation Requirements

To receive a bachelor's degree a student must fill three groups of requirements: (1) general education requirements, (2) university requirements, and (3) major requirements.

General Education Requirements

Students should contact their college advisement center for information about general education courses that will also fill major requirements.

Languages of Learning

Precollege Math (zero to one course)
(or Math ACT score of at least 22)
0–3.0 hours
First-Year Writing (one course) 3.0
Advanced Writing (one course) 3.0
Advanced Languages/Math/Music
(one to four courses)
3–20.0

Liberal Arts Core

Biological Science (one to two courses) 3–6.0
Physical Science (one to two courses) 3–7.0
American Heritage (one to two courses) 3–6.0
Wellness (one to three courses) 1.5–2.0
Civilization (two courses) 6.0

Arts and Sciences Electives

Arts and Letters (one course) 3.0
Natural Sciences (one course) 3–4.0
Social and Behavioral Sciences (one course) 3.0

Note 1: For a complete list of courses that will fill each GE category, see the General Education section of the current class schedule.

Note 2: Additional information about general education requirements can be found in the General Education section of the current class schedule or this catalog.

Minimum University Requirements

Religion 14.0
Residency 30.0
Hours needed to graduate 120.0

Cumulative GPA must be at least 2.0.

Note: See the Graduation section of this catalog for more information.

Major Requirements

Complete the major requirements listed for one of the folowing undergraduate degree programs.

Undergraduate Programs and Degrees

BA Chemistry
BA Chemistry Education
BS Chemistry
BS Biochemistry
Minors Chemistry
Chemistry Education

Students should see the department office for help or information concerning the undergraduate programs.

Note: For the molecular biology program see the Molecular Biology section of this catalog. The molecular biology minor couples effectively with certain majors in this department.

Graduate Programs and Degrees

MS Chemistry
MS Biochemistry
PhD Chemistry
PhD Biochemistry

For more information see the BYU 2001–2002 Graduate Catalog.



General Information

Required High School Preparation

  1. It is recommended that a student complete the following courses in high school:

    Because mathematics provides the foundation for all work in the physical and mathematical sciences, particular attention is paid to high school preparation in this subject.

    To decide which mathematics course should be taken first, contact the Mathematics Department, 292 TMCB, and request a mathematics placement test.

  2. All students, especially freshmen and those transferring, should contact the department between March and August each year for advisement about efficient course scheduling and opportunities for student employment.

Scholarships

Kenneth W. Brighton, Carl J. Christensen, H. Tracy Hall, and Ida Tanner Hamblin scholarships are available to qualified chemistry majors.



BA Chemistry (57.5 hours*)

This degree provides an excellent preparation for those individuals in preprofessional programs (e.g., medicine, dentistry, master of business administration, or law), and it also provides strong career alternatives in chemistry.

Major Requirements

  1. No more than 3 hours of D credit is allowed in major courses.

  2. The final 10 hours of required chemistry credit must be taken at BYU.

  3. Complete the following:
    Chem 111H, 112, 213, 227, 351M, 352M, 354, 391, 461, 462, 464, 501.

  4. Complete the following:
    Math 112, 113, 343.
    Phscs 121, 123, 220, 250.

  5. After consulting with an advisor, complete 3 hours from the following:
    Chem 455, 481, 496R, 497R, 499R, 514, 518, 521, 523, 552, 553, 561, 563, 564, 565, 569, 594R, 596R.

Recommended Courses

CS 130, 142.
Math 214.
Either Mcbio 130
Or Zool 101, 102.
RelC 491, 492.

Note: Supporting courses suggested by most medical and dental schools are found in the Preprofessional Programs section of this catalog. The more rigorous chemistry, mathematics, and physics courses required for the chemistry majors will satisfy the minimum requirements listed there. Elective courses in biochemistry and in biological science are especially pertinent to these preprofessional programs.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



BA Chemistry Education (82.5-85.5 hours,* including certification hours)

This degree provides preparation for professional high school teaching. High school chemistry teachers will find opportunities available and will know the satisfaction of guiding good students into essential and rewarding careers. Students should work closely with both the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the David O. McKay School of Education Advisement Center and Certification Office.

Major Requirements

  1. No more than 3 hours of D credit is allowed in major courses.

  2. The final 10 hours of required chemistry credit must be taken at BYU.

  3. Contact the Education Advisement Center for entrance requirements into the licensure program.

  4. A teaching minor is not required for licensure. However, it is strongly recommended.

  5. Complete the following:
    Chem 111H, 112, 213, 227, 351M, 391, 461, 501.

  6. Complete one course from the following:
    Chem 352M, 462.

  7. Complete one course from the following:
    Chem 481.
    Math 343.

    Note: Chem 352 is prerequisite to 481.

  8. Complete one of the following options:
    Either Mcbio 130.
    Or Zool 101, 102.

  9. Complete the following:
    Math 112, 113.
    Phscs 121, 220.

  10. Complete one of the following four options:
    • Biol 150.
    • Geol 111.
    • Phscs 123, 250.
    • Stat 421.

  11. Complete two hours of the following:
    Chem 354, 464, 497R.

  12. After consulting with an advisor, complete 3 hours from the following:
    Chem 354, 464, 481, 482, 496R, 497R, 499R, 514, 521, 523, 552, 553, 561, 563, 564, 565, 569, 594R, 596R.
    Phil 423.

  13. Complete the Professional Education Component (28–29 hours): see the Secondary Education section of this catalog for licensure requirements.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



BS Chemistry (74.5–75.5 hours*)

This is the preferred degree for chemistry majors (approved by the American Chemical Society) and those who desire an advanced degree (MS, PhD) in chemistry.

Major Requirements

  1. No more than 3 hours of D credit is allowed in major courses.

  2. The final 10 hours of required chemistry credit must be taken at BYU.

  3. Complete the following:
    Chem 111H, 112, 213, 227, 351M, 352M, 354, 391, 455, 461, 462, 464, 481, 501, 514, 521, 523.

  4. Complete 1 hour of the following:
    Chem 594R.

  5. Complete one of the following options:
    Either Mcbio 130.
    Or Zool 101, 102.

  6. Complete the following:
    Math 112, 113, 343.
    Phscs 121, 123, 220, 250.

  7. After consulting with an advisor, complete 3 hours from the following:
    Chem 482, 496R, 497R, 499R, 518, 552, 553, 561, 563, 564, 565, 569, 584, 596R.

    Note: With approval, certain other 300-level and above courses in the allied fields of physics, statistics, engineering, and biology may be taken to satisfy this requirement. Because of the importance of biochemistry, polymer chemistry, and materials science, courses in those areas should receive serious consideration by chemistry students.

Recommended Courses

CS 130, 142.
Math 214.
RelC 491, 492.

Note: Elective courses, beyond the requirements above, should be selected in consultation with an advisor. The following should be given consideration: advanced chemistry, foreign languages (especially French, German, Japanese, and Russian), biological sciences, computer science, engineering, mathematics, physics, statistics.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



BS Biochemistry (76.5–77.5 hours*)

Students preparing for health-related fields (medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine) or those who desire an advanced degree (MS, PhD) in biochemistry, biology, or the health sciences receive excellent preparation from this degree program.

Major Requirements

  1. No more than 3 hours of D credit is allowed in major courses.

  2. The final 10 hours of required chemistry credit must be taken at BYU.

  3. Complete the following:
    Chem 111H, 112, 213, 227, 351M, 352M, 354, 391, 461, 464, 468, 481, 482, 501, 584, 586.

  4. Complete 1 hour of the following:
    Chem 594R (two enrollments).

  5. Complete one of the following options:
    Either Mcbio 130.
    Or Zool 101, 102.

  6. Complete the following:
    Biol 372.
    Math 112, 113.
    Phscs 121, 123, 220, 250.
    Stat 221.

  7. After consulting with an advisor, complete 3 hours from the following:
    Chem 455, 489, 496R, 497R, 499R, 514, 518, 521, 523, 552, 553, 561, 563, 564, 565, 569, 581, 583, 596R.

    Note: With prior approval, many 400- and 500-level courses in botany, microbiology, and zoology will fill this requirement.

Recommended Courses

CS 130, 142.
Math 214, 343.
RelC 491, 492.
Zool 373.

Note: Supporting courses suggested by most medical and dental schools are found in the Preprofessional Programs section of this catalog. The more rigorous chemistry, mathematics, and physics courses required for the chemistry majors will satisfy the minimum requirements listed there. Elective courses in biochemistry and in biological science are especially pertinent to these preprofessional programs.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



Minor Chemistry (18-20 hours*)

  1. Complete one of the following options:
    Either Chem 111H, 112, 213
    Or Chem 105, 106, 107, 223.

  2. Complete one of the following options:
    Either Chem 351, 352
         And Chem 353 (2 hours) or 354
    Or Chem 461, 462, 464

Note: When all of the chemistry credit required for a minor is transferred from another school, at least one course in chemistry must be taken at BYU with a grade of C or better—or the student may request to take a standardized national exam covering advanced material required for the minor. Chemistry programs at some schools have been evaluated, and their credit is acceptable for the minor. No more than one course with a grade in the D range will be allowed.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



Minor Chemistry Education (16-18 hours*)

  1. Complete one of the following options:
    Either Chem 111H, 112, 213, 351
    Or Chem 105, 106, 107, 223, 351.

  2. Complete one course from the following:
    Chem 461, 462, 468.

Note: When all of the chemistry credit required for a minor is transferred from another school, at least one course in chemistry must be taken at BYU with a grade of C or better—or the student may request to take a standardized national exam covering advanced material required for the minor. Chemistry programs at some schools have been evaluated, and their credit is acceptable for the minor. No more than one course with a grade in the D range will be allowed.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



Chemistry and Biochemistry (Chem)

Class Schedule Major Academic Plan (MAP)

Undergraduate Courses

100. Elementary College Chemistry. (3:3:0) On dem. Independent Study also. Recommended: PhyS 100 or equivalent.

Structure of matter and the chemical consequences of that structure. For nonscience and nonmedical majors.

101. Introductory General Chemistry. (3:3:0) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: Math 97 or equivalent.

Atomic and molecular structure, periodic relationships, states of matter, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, acids and bases. Primarily for nonscience majors who require a broad introduction to general chemistry.

103. Introductory Chemistry Laboratory. (1:0:3) W Prerequisite: Chem 101 or equivalent.

Introductory laboratory techniques required for simple classical experiments in chemistry.

105. General College Chemistry. (4:5:0) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: Math 110 (or equivalent) or concurrent enrollment.

Atomic and molecular structure including bonding and periodic properties of the elements; reaction energetics, electrochemistry, acids and bases, inorganic and organic chemistry. Primarily for students in engineering and biological sciences. Three lectures and two recitation sections per week.

106. General College Chemistry. (3:4:0) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: Chem 105 or equivalent.

Continuation of Chem 105 but covering most of the topics in a more quantitative way. Detailed treatment of thermodynamics and equilibria. Three lectures and one recitation section per week.

107. General College Chemistry Laboratory. (1:0:3) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: Chem 106 or concurrent enrollment.

Chemical properties, chemical reactions, collection and interpretion of data, preparation of reports. Required for most students needing one year of general chemistry.

111. Principles of Chemistry. (3:3:1) F Prerequisite: Math 110 (or equivalent) or concurrent enrollment. Strongly recommended: high school chemistry, physics, and introductory calculus or concurrent enrollment in Math 112.

Stoichiometry, kinetic-molecular theory, thermodynamics, states of matter, solutions and equilibria, electrochemistry, structure and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics. Tutorial included.

111H. Honors Principles of Chemistry. (4:3:4) F Prerequisite: Math 110 (or equivalent) or concurrent enrollment. Strongly recommended: high school chemistry, physics, and introductory calculus or concurrent enrollment in Math 112.

Stoichiometry, kinetic-molecular theory, thermodynamics, states of matter, solutions and equilibria, electrochemistry, structure and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics. For chemistry majors. Laboratory and tutorial included.

112. Principles of Chemistry. (3:3:2) W Prerequisite: Chem 111, 111H, or equivalent.

Continuation of Chem 111 or 111H. Tutorial included.

152. Introductory Organic Chemistry. (2:2:0) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: Chem 101 or adequate high school preparation in chemistry.

Principles of structure and reactivity, properties and reactions of compound classes, syntheses.

213. Introductory Inorganic Laboratory. (3:1:6) F, W Prerequisite: Chem 106 or concurrent enrollment in 112.

Principles and techniques of making precise chemical measurements. Synthesis, properties, and identification of inorganic compounds.

223. Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis. (4:2:6) F, Sp Prerequisite: Chem 106 or equivalent.

Principles of chemical equilibrium, quantitative chemical measurements, and qualitative detection of selected chemical species. Primarily for majors in molecular biology and the life sciences.

227. Introductory Analytical Chemistry. (4:2:6) F, Sp Prerequisite: Chem 213.

Principles of quantitative analysis, introductory instrumental methods, and computer applications to chemical analysis.

281. Introductory Biochemistry. (3:3:0) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: Chem 152 or equivalent.

Relationships between chemical structure and physiological function, overall correlation of metabolism. Students with more extensive preparation should register for Chem 481.

351. Organic Chemistry. (3:3:0) F, W, Sp Prerequisite: Chem 107 or 213 or equivalent.

Chemical bonds and molecular structure, conformation and configuration, functional classes, reactions and mechanisms, syntheses. Primarily for majors in chemistry, chemical engineering, and the biological sciences.

351M. Organic Chemistry—Majors. (3:3:0) F Prerequisite: Chem 107 or 213 or equivalent.

Chemical bonds and molecular structure, conformation and configuration, functional classes, reactions and mechanisms, syntheses.

352. Organic Chemistry. (3:3:0) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: Chem 351 or equivalent.

Continuation of Chem 351.

352M. Organic Chemistry—Majors. (3:3:0) W Prerequisite: Chem 351M or equivalent.

Continuation of Chem 351M.

353. Organic Chemistry Laboratory— Nonmajors. (1–2:0:6) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: Chem 352 or concurrent enrollment.

Physical and chemical properties, isolation and purification, characterization, syntheses. For predentistry, premedicine, and other majors who do not intend to take Chem 455.

354. Organic Chemistry Laboratory— Majors. (2:0:6) F, W, Sp Prerequisite: Chem 352 or concurrent enrollment.

Physical and chemical properties, manipulative skills, isolation and purification, characterization and identification, syntheses.

391. Technical Writing Using Chemical Literature. (3:3:0) F, W Prerequisite: Chem 227, 352.

Intensive technical writing course based on chemical literature sources. Fulfills GE Advanced Writing requirement.

455. Synthesis and Qualitative Organic Analysis. (3:1:6) F Prerequisite: Chem 354; 501 or concurrent enrollment.

Laboratory course emphasizing isolation, purification, and characterization of major and minor products from selected syntheses. For chemistry and other science majors.

461. Physical Chemistry. (3:3:0) F, W Prerequisite: Chem 227 or ChEn 263 or equivalent; Phscs 123 or concurrent enrollment. Recommended: Math 343.

States of matter, thermodynamics and equilibria, kinetic-molecular theory, quantum mechanics, group theory, atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy.

462. Physical Chemistry. (3:3:0) W, Sp Prerequisite: Chem 461.

Continuation of Chem 461.

464. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (1–2:0:Arr.) F, W Prerequisite: Chem 227; 461, 501, or concurrent enrollment.

Precise data collection for classical experiments, computer manipulation of data, report preparation.

468. Biophysical Chemistry. (3:3:0) W Prerequisite: Chem 461; 481 or concurrent registration.

Application of physical chemistry to biological systems. Thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, biophysical experimental techniques. For biochemistry (BS) majors and those interested in the health professions or biochemistry.

481. Biochemistry 1. (3:3:0) F, W, Sp Prerequisite: Chem 352, Mcbio 130; or equivalent.

First-semester biochemistry. Molecular components of cells, chemical structure and function, enzymes, metabolic transformations, photosynthesis. For chemistry majors and students in biological sciences who contemplate pursuing advanced degrees, including medicine.

482. Biochemistry 2. (3:3:0) W, Sp Prerequisite: Chem 481 or equivalent.

Second-semester biochemistry. Nucleic acid biochemistry and molecular biology: nucleotide metabolism, chromosome and chromatin structure, DNA structure and replication, RNA transcription and gene expression, protein synthesis and regulation, eukaryotic gene systems, signal transduction.

489. Structural Biochemistry. (3:3:0) F Prerequisite: Chem 481 or equivalent.

Molecular structures of proteins, RNA and DNA as determinants of biological function. Topics include thermodynamics of folding and binding, structural determination, spectroscopy, modeling, protein recognition.

496R. Academic Internship: Chemistry and Biochemistry. (1—6:Arr.:Arr. ea.) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: instructor's consent; Chem 501 or concurrent enrollment or special safety training.

Research experience in an industrial, academic, or government laboratory in collaboration with a BYU faculty colleague/supervisor.

497R. Undergraduate Special Problems. (1–6:Arr.:Arr. ea.) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: instructor's consent and Chem 501 or concurrent enrollment or special safety training.

Undergraduate research experience .

499R. Honors Thesis. (1–6:Arr.:Arr. ea.) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: instructor's consent and Chem 501 or concurrent enrollment or special safety training.

500-Level Graduate Courses (available to advanced undergraduates)

501. Chemical Handling and Safe Laboratory Practices. (0.5:0.5:0) F, Sp

Survey of appropriate methods in handling hazardous materials and disposing of waste; legal rights and requirements; safety in chemistry laboratory work.

514. Inorganic Chemistry. (3:3:0) F Prerequisite: Chem 461; 462 or 468.

In-depth treatment of theoretical concepts in inorganic chemistry and the descriptive chemistry of some of the elements.

518. Inorganic Synthesis. (2:0:6) On dem. Prerequisite: Chem 501 or concurrent registration; Chem 514.

Syntheses that demonstrate a variety of techniques and a range of inorganic materials.

521. Instrumental Analysis Lecture. (2:2:0) F Prerequisite: Chem 464 or equivalent; Chem 501 or concurrent enrollment.

Modern instrumental methods and basic principles of instrumentation.

523. Instrumental Analysis Laboratory. (2:0:6) W Prerequisite: Chem 464 or equivalent; Chem 521.

Continuation of Chem 521. Laboratory experience with modern analytical instrumentation.

552. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (3:3:0) F Prerequisite: Chem 351, 352, 461, 462.

Physical aspects of organic chemistry; mechanisms, reaction intermediates, bonding, stereochemical and stereoelectronic effects, molecular orbital theory, Lewis acidity and basicity.

553. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (3:3:0) W Prerequisite: Chem 351, 352.

Synthetic aspects of organic chemistry; oxidations, reductions, concerted reactions, stereoselectivity, synthetic equivalents, protecting groups. Examples of natural product total synthesis.

561. Chemical Thermodynamics. (3:3:0) W Prerequisite: Chem 461, 462.

Development of the principles of chemical thermodynamics, including laws, pure materials, mixtures, equilibria, and elementary statistical mechanics.

563. Reaction Kinetics. (3:3:0) W alt. yr. Prerequisite: Chem 461, 462.

Theoretical aspects of chemical kinetics in the gas phase and in solution. Rates and mechanisms in solution, rapid reactions, and other topics.

564. Nuclear Chemistry and Radiochemistry. (2–3:3:0) W alt. yr. Prerequisite: Chem 461, 462.

Introduction to nuclear structure, radioactivity, nuclear spectroscopy, and nuclear reactions, emphasizing applications in chemistry.

565. Introduction to Quantum Chemistry. (3:3:0) F Prerequisite: Chem 461, 462.

Introduction to physical and mathematical aspects of quantum theory, emphasizing application of the Schrodinger wave equation to chemical systems.

569. Fundamentals of Spectroscopy. (3:3:0) W alt yr. Prerequisite: Chem 461; 462 or 468; Chem 523 or equivalent.

Atomic and molecular spectroscopy and application of group theoretical concepts. Types of experiments and interpretation of data.

581. Advanced Biochemical Methodology 1. (3:3:0) F Prerequisite: Chem 482 or equivalent.

First of two required courses for biochemistry graduate students. Physical methods used in biochemical research, including centrifugation, structural determinations, and use of radioactivity and spectroscopy.

583. Advanced Biochemical Methodology 2. (3:3:0) W Prerequisite: Chem 482 or equivalent.

Second of two required courses for biochemistry graduate students. Molecular biological methods used in biochemistry, including immunotechniques, bioinformatics, and selected recombinant DNA techniques.

584. Biochemistry Laboratory/Proteins. (3:1:2) F, W Prerequisite: Chem 481 or equivalent.

Introduction to current biochemical research procedures including spectrophotometry, chromatography, electrophoresis, and immunological techniques. Protein over-expression; isolation and characterization methods. Enzyme kinetics and protein-ligand interactions. Introduction to bioinformatics.

586. Biochemistry Laboratory/Nucleic Acids. (2:0:2) F, W Prerequisite: Chem 482 or equivalent.

Laboratory course covering major techniques involved in isolation, amplification, and cloning of recombinant DNA as well as isolation, synthesis, translation, and identification of RNA.

594R. General Seminar. (0.5:1:0 ea.) F, W

Research topics presented by faculty and visiting scientists. Required every semester in residence of all senior BS majors and graduate students in chemistry and biochemistry.

596R. Special Topics in Chemistry. (1–3:3:0 ea.) On dem. Prerequisite: Chem 351, 352; Chem 367 or 461.

Graduate Courses

For 600- and 700-level courses, see the BYU 2001–2002 Graduate Catalog.



Chemistry and Biochemistry Faculty

Professors

Boerio-Goates, Juliana (1981) BA, Seton Hill Coll., 1975; MS, PhD, U. of Michigan, 1977, 1979.

Eatough, Delbert J. (1971) BS, PhD, Brigham Young U., 1964, 1967.

Farnsworth, Paul B. (1981) BS, Brigham Young U., 1977; PhD, U. of Wisconsin, Madison.

Fleming, Steven A. (1985) BS, U. of Utah, 1978; PhD, U. of Wisconsin, Madison, 1984.

Goates, Steven R. (1981) BS, Brigham Young U., 1976; MS, PhD, U. of Michigan, 1977, 1981.

Hansen, Lee Duane (1972) BS, PhD, Brigham Young U., 1962, 1965.

Lamb, John D. (1985) BS, PhD, Brigham Young U., 1971, 1978.

Lee, Milton L. (1976) BA, U. of Utah, 1971; PhD, Indiana U., 1975.

Mangelson, Nolan F. (1969) AS, Snow Coll., 1959; BS, Utah State U., 1961; MS, Brigham Young U., 1963; PhD, U. of California, Berkeley, 1967.

Nordmeyer, Francis R. (1972) BA, Wabash Coll., 1961; MA, Wesleyan U., 1964; PhD, Stanford U., 1967.

Owen, Noel L. (1987) BSc, U. of Wales, 1960; PhD, Cambridge U., England, 1964; DSc, U. of Wales, 1983.

Robins, Morris J. (1986) BA, U. of Utah, 1961; PhD, Arizona State U., 1965.

Watt, Gerald D. (1989) BA, PhD, Brigham Young U., 1962, 1966.

Woolley, Earl M. (1970) BS, PhD, Brigham Young U., 1966, 1969.

Zimmerman, S. Scott (1978) BS, Brigham Young U., 1969; PhD, Florida State U., 1973.

Associate Professors

Andrus, Merritt B. (1997) BS, Brigham Young U., 1986; PhD, U. of Utah, 1991.

Dearden, David V. (1994) BS, Brigham Young U., 1983; PhD, California Inst. of Technology, 1989.

Elton, Terry S.(1995) BS, Weber State U., 1981; PhD, Washington State U., 1986.

Graves, Steven W. (1998) BA, U. of Utah, 1969; MPhil, PhD, Yale U., 1972, 1978.

Kuchar, Marvin C. J. (1979) AA, Eastern Arizona Coll., 1955; BS, PhD, Brigham Young U., 1957, 1963.

Savage, Paul B. (1995) BS, Brigham Young U., 1988; PhD, U. of Wisconsin, 1993.

Shirts, Randall B. (1991) BS, Brigham Young U., 1972; AM, PhD, Harvard U., 1978, 1979.

Simmons, Daniel L. (1989) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1978, 1980; PhD, U. of Wisconsin, Madison, 1986.

Assistant Professors

Asplund, Matthew C. (2000) BS, Brigham Young U., 1992; PhD, U. of California, Berkeley, 1998.

Harrison, Roger G. (1995) BS, Utah State U., 1986; PhD, U. of Utah, 1993.

Kaspar, Roger L.(1995) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1985, 1986; PhD, U. Of Washington, 1991.

Linford, Matthew L. (2000) BS, Brigham Young U., 1990; PhD, Stanford U., 1996.

Peterson, Matt A.(1995) BS, Utah State U., 1987; PhD, U. Of Arizona, 1992.

Willardson, Barry M. (1996) BA, Brigham Young U., 1984; PhD, Purdue U., 1990.

Woodfield, Brian F. (1997) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1986, 1988; PhD, U. of California, Berkeley, 1995.

Woolley, Adam T. (2000) BS, Brigham Young U., 1992; PhD, U. of California, Berkeley, 1997.

Teaching Professor

Cannon, John Francis (1970) BS, PhD, Brigham Young U., 1965, 1969.

Associate Teaching Professor

Hinshaw, Barbara C. (1989) BA, Westminster Coll., 1966; MS, U. of Utah, 1969.

Assistant Teaching Professor

Brown, Philip R. (1999) BS, PhD, Brigham Young U., 1982, 1986.

Emeriti

Bills, James L. (1963) BS, U. of Utah, 1958; PhD, Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 1963.

Blackham, Angus Udell (1952) BA, Brigham Young U., 1949; MA, PhD, U. of Cincinnati, 1950, 1952.

Bradshaw, Jerald S. (1966) BS, U. of Utah, 1955; PhD, U. of California, Los Angeles, 1963.

Broadbent, H. Smith (1946) BS, Brigham Young U., 1942; PhD, Iowa State U. of Science and Technology, 1946.

Butler, Eliot A. (1956) BS, PhD, California Inst. of Technology, 1952, 1956.

Cluff, Coran L. (1960) BS, Northern Arizona U., 1952; MS, PhD, U. of Michigan, 1955, 1961.

Dalley, Nelson Kent (1968) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1960, 1964; PhD, U. of Texas, Austin, 1968.

Goates, J. Rex (1947) BS, Brigham Young U., 1942; PhD, U. of Wisconsin, Madison, 1947.

Gubler, Clark J. (1958) BA, Brigham Young U., 1939; MA, Utah State U., 1941; PhD, U. of California, Berkeley, 1945.

Hall, H. Tracy (1955) BS, MS, PhD, U. of Utah, 1942, 1943, 1948.

Hawkins, Richard T. (1959) BA, Brigham Young U., 1951; PhD, U. of Illinois, 1959.

Izatt, Reed M. (1956) BS, Utah State U., 1951; PhD, Pennsylvania State U., 1954.

Mangum, John H. (1963) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1957, 1959; PhD, U. of Washington, 1963.

Nelson, K. LeRoi (1956) BS, Utah State U., 1948; PhD, Purdue U., 1952.

Ott, J. Bevan (1960) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1955, 1956; PhD, U. of California, Berkeley, 1959.

Paul, Edward G. (1965) BS, PhD, U. of Utah, 1958, 1962.

Smith, Marvin A. (1966) BS, Utah State U., 1960; MS, PhD, U. of Wisconsin, Madison, 1962, 1964.

Snow, Richard L. (1957) BS, PhD, U. of Utah, 1953, 1957.

Swensen, Albert D. (1947) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1937, 1938; PhD, Louisiana State U., New Orleans, 1941.

Thorne, James M. (1966) BA, Utah State U., 1961; PhD, U. of California, Berkeley, 1966.

Vernon, Leo P. (1970) BA, Brigham Young U., 1948; PhD, Iowa State U. of Science and Technology, 1951.

Wilson, Byron J. (1965) BS, Idaho State U., 1955; MA, Southern Illinois U. 1958; PhD, U. of Washington, 1961.






Back

Catalog Homepage

BYU Homepage


Please report any errors. Updated 20 March 2001 by web_ugrad_cat@byu.edu