UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 20012002
Brigham Young University
Back Physics and Astronomy

   

R. Steven Turley, Chair
N-281A ESC, (801) 378-3095

College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences Advisement Center
N-179 ESC, (801) 378-6270

Admission to Degree Program

All degree programs in the Department of Physics and Astronomy are open enrollment. However, special limitations apply for teaching majors.

The Discipline

Through its undergraduate offerings the Department of Physics and Astronomy seeks to help students of all disciplines to become more fully aware of our physical environment from subatomic particles to the cosmos, to understand the structure and behavior of matter and energy, to realize that man is capable of comprehending natural laws, and to appreciate both the strengths and the limitations of science.

Career Opportunities

A degree in physics and astronomy can provide:

  1. Preparation for those who intend to enter industrial or governmental service as physicists or astronomers.
  2. Education for those who intend to pursue graduate work in physics or astronomy.
  3. Undergraduate education for those who will pursue graduate work in the professions: business (e.g., an MBA), law, medicine, etc.
  4. Fundamental background for other physical sciences and engineering, in preparation for graduate study in these fields.
  5. Physics fundamentals required by the biological science, medical, dental, nursing, and related programs.
  6. Education in the subject matter of physics for prospective teachers of the physical sciences.

Graduation Requirements

To receive a bachelor's degree a student must fill three groups of requirements: (1) general education requirements; (2) university requirements; and (3) major requirements.

General Education Requirements

Students should contact their college advisement center for information about general education courses that will also fill major requirements.

Languages of Learning

Precollege Math (zero to one course)
(or Math ACT score of at least 22)
03.0 hours
First-Year Writing (one course) 3.0
Advanced Writing (one course) 3.0
Advanced Languages/Math/Music
(one to four courses)
320.0

Liberal Arts Core

Biological Science (one to two courses) 36.0
Physical Science (one to two courses) 37.0
American Heritage (one to two courses) 36.0
Wellness (one to three courses) 1.52.0
Civilization (two courses) 6.0

Arts and Sciences Electives

Arts and Letters (one course) 3.0
Natural Sciences (one course) 34.0
Social and Behavioral Sciences (one course) 3.0

Note 1: For a complete list of courses that will fill each GE category, see the General Education section of the current class schedule.

Note 2: Additional information about general education requirements can be found in the General Education section of the current class schedule or this catalog.

Minimum University Requirements

Religion 14.0
Residency 30.0
Hours needed to graduate 120.0

Cumulative GPA must be at least 2.0.

Note: See the Graduation section of this catalog for more information.

Major Requirements

Complete the major requirements listed under one of the following undergraduate degree programs.

Undergraduate Programs and Degrees

BA Physics Teaching
BS Applied Physics
Emphases:
Computer Science
Selected Options
BS Physics
BS Physics-Astronomy
Minors Astronomy
Physics
Physics Teaching

Students should see their college advisement center for help or information concerning the undergraduate programs.

Graduate Programs and Degrees

MS Physics
PhD Physics
PhD Physics and Astronomy

For more information see the BYU 20012002 Graduate Catalog.

General Information

  1. It is recommended that a student complete the following courses in high school:
    • 3 units of English
    • 1 unit of physical science, either chemistry or physics.
    • 4 units of mathematics, consisting of algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and calculus. This should qualify students to begin college mathematics with Math 113, Calculus 2.
      Because mathematics provides the foundation for all work in the physical and mathematical sciences, high school preparation in this subject is of particular importance.

  2. Students in physics should take mathematics beginning the first semester of the freshman year. Physics majors should ordinarily begin with Math 113. If preparation is inadequate, students might wish to enter the university during the summer term and bring their mathematics preparation to the point where they can take Math 113 concurrently with Phscs 121 during the fall semester.

  3. Students are strongly urged to learn to use a computer, including some knowledge of programming.



BA Physics Teaching (72.573.5 hours,* including licensure hours)

Major Requirements

  1. No D credit is allowed in major courses.

  2. Contact the Education Advisement Center for entrance requirements into the certification program.

  3. A teaching minor is not required for certification. However, it is strongly recommended.

  4. Complete the following:
    Phscs 121, 123, 127, 150, 191, 220, 222, 250, 340.

  5. Complete one course from the following:
    Hist 314.
    Phil 423.
    Phscs 314.

  6. Complete the following:
    Math 112, 113, 212, 334.

  7. Complete an additional 9 hours from the following or any 300-, 400-, or 500-level physics course not already taken (at least 6 hours must be upper-division physics courses):
    Phscs 137, 167, 281.

  8. Complete the Professional Education Component (2829 hours). See the Secondary Education section of this catalog for licensure requirements.

Recommended Courses

Chem 105, 106.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



BS Applied Physics: Computer Science Emphasis (63.566.5 hours*)

Major Requirements

  1. No D credit is allowed in major courses.

  2. Complete the following:
    Phscs 121, 123, 191, 220, 222, 230, 318, 330, 340, 350, 430, 441, 581.

  3. Complete one of the following options:
    Either Math 113, 212, 334.
    Or Math 113, 214, 334, 343.

  4. Complete one course from the following:
    Math 311.
    Phscs 512.

  5. Complete the following:
    CS 142, 235, 236, 240, 252.

  6. Complete one course from the following:
    Phscs 321, 427, 431, 442, 451, 471, 517, 545, 561, 571, 585.

  7. Complete a capstone project, including the following:
    • Meet with department applied physics capstone project coordinator early in the junior year to obtain information about projects and procedures.
    • Complete 2 hours of the following:
      Phscs 492R.

Recommended Course

Phscs 442 is strongly recommended.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



BS Applied Physics: Selected Options Emphasis (57.560.5 hours*)

Major Requirements

  1. No D credit is allowed in major courses.

  2. Consult with a faculty advisor as early in career as possible.

  3. Complete the following:
    Phscs 121, 123, 150, 191, 220, 222, 230, 250, 318, 321, 330, 340, 350, 430, 441.

  4. Complete one course from the following:
    ECEn 460.
    Phscs 442, 471.

  5. After gaining department chair's approval of courses selected to define an option, complete an additional 12 hours of electives (cannot include any courses already taken above). These 12 hours must consist of a coherent set of upper-division courses with an identified educational goal. Some standard options are available from the department, including microelectronics.

  6. Complete one of the following options:
    Either Math 113, 212, 334.
    Or Math 113, 214, 334, 343.

  7. Complete a capstone project, including the following:
    • Meet with department applied physics capstone project coordinator early in the junior year to obtain information about projects and procedures.
    • Complete 2 hours of the following:
      Phscs 492R.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



BS Physics (57.560.5 hours*)

Major Requirements

  1. No D credit is allowed in major courses.

  2. Complete the following:
    Phscs 121, 123, 150, 191, 220, 222, 230, 250, 318, 321, 330, 340, 350, 430, 431, 441, 442, 451, 452, 471.

  3. Complete one of the following options:
    Either Math 113, 212, 334.
    Or Math 113, 214, 334, 343.

  4. Complete a senior thesis, including the following:
    • Meet with department undergraduate research coordinator early in the junior year to obtain information about research projects and senior thesis procedures.
    • Complete 2 hours of the following:
      Phscs 498R.

Recommended Course

Chem 105.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



BS Physics-Astronomy (59.562.5 hours*)

Major Requirements

  1. No D credit is allowed in major courses.

  2. Complete the following:
    Phscs 121, 123, 150, 191, 220, 222, 227, 228, 230, 250, 318, 321, 329, 330, 340, 427, 428, 431, 451, 471.

  3. Complete one of the following options:
    Either Math 113, 212, 334.
    Or Math 113, 214, 334, 343.

  4. Complete a senior thesis, including the following:
    • Meet with department undergraduate research coordinator early in the junior year to obtain information about research projects and senior thesis procedures.
    • Complete 2 hours of the following:
      Phscs 498R.

Recommended Course

Chem 105.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



Minor Astronomy (26 hours*)

Minor Requirements

Complete the following:

Phscs 121, 227, 228, 329, 427, 428.
Math 112, 113.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



Minor Physics (23 hours*)

Minor Requirements

Complete the following:

Phscs 121, 123, 150, 220, 222, 250, 340.
Math 112, 113.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



Minor Physics Teaching (25 hours*)

Minor Requirements

Complete the following:

Phscs 121, 123, 150, 220, 222, 250, 314.
Math 112, 113.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



Physics and Astronomy (Phscs)

Class Schedule Major Academic Plan (MAP)

Undergraduate Courses

101. Fundamentals of Physics. (3:3:0) F

Principles of classical and modern physics as they relate to current concepts of our physical environment.

105. Introductory Applied Physics. (3:3:0) F, W, Sp Prerequisite: high school algebra and trigonometry. Recommended: concurrent enrollment in Phscs 107.

Applied physics course not requiring calculus. Topics include mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound.

106. Introductory Applied Physics. (3:3:0) F, W, Su Prerequisite: Phscs 105 or equivalent. Recommended: concurrent enrollment in Phscs 108.

Continuation of Phscs 105. Topics include electricity and magnetism, atomic and nuclear physics, and optics.

107. Introductory Applied Physics Laboratory. (1:0:3) F, W, Sp Prerequisite: Phscs 105 or concurrent enrollment.

108. Introductory Applied Physics Laboratory. (1:0:3) F, W, Su Prerequisite: Phscs 106 or concurrent enrollment.

121. Principles of Physics 1. (3:3:1) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: calculus.

Newtonian mechanics. Weekly lab.

123. Principles of Physics 2. (3:3:1) F, W, Sp Prerequisite: Phscs 121.

Waves, thermal physics, optics, special relativity, and introduction to modern physics. Weekly lab.

127. Descriptive Astronomy. (3:3:0.5) F, W, Sp, Su Honors and Independent Study also.

Nonmathematical presentation of knowledge of the content and history of the cosmos, frequently using observatory and planetarium.

137. Introduction to the Atmosphere and Weather. (3:3:0) F, W Prerequisite: PhyS 100 or equivalent.

Nonmathematical introduction to characteristics of the atmosphere, emphasizing structure and dynamic behavior, including the environmental impact of man.

150. Introduction to Experimental Physics 1. (1:1:2) F, W, Sp Prerequisite: Phscs 220 or concurrent enrollment.

Using laboratory equipment, sources of uncertainty, statistical analysis of data, curve fitting, computer data acquisition, measurements of motion, electrical measurements.

167. Descriptive Acoustics of Music and Speech. (3:3:0) F, W, Sp Prerequisite: PhyS 100 or equivalent.

Introductory acoustics course, emphasizing physical principles underlying production and perception of music and speech.

191. Introduction to Physics Careers and Research. (0.5:1:0) F

Survey of BYU undergraduate physics and astronomy programs, careers in physics and astronomy, and current physics and astronomy research. Take first semester after registered as physics major.

198. Physics and Mathematics Review. (1:2:0) F 1st blk., W 1st blk. Prerequisite: Phscs 121; Math 113 or concurrent enrollment.

Review of mathematics and introductory physics for returning missionaries and others returning after a significant break.

220. Principles of Physics 3. (3:3:1) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: Phscs 121 or equivalent; Math 113 or equivalent.

Electricity and magnetism. Weekly lab.

222. Modern Physics. (3:3:0) F, W, Su Prerequisite: Phscs 121, 123, 220.

Quantum physics, atoms, molecules, condensed matter, nuclei, elementary particles, and selected topics in contemporary physics.

227. Solar System Astronomy. (3:3:0) F Prerequisite: Phscs 121, 123; Math 113 or concurrent enrollment.

Physics of light and matter, Newton's laws, solar-system dynamics, and planetary surfaces and atmospheres.

228. Stellar and Extragalactic Astronomy. (3:3:0) W Prerequisite: Math 113, Phscs 227.

Stellar atmospheres, stellar interiors, stellar evolution, interstellar matter, galactic structure, external galaxies, and cosmology.

230. Computational Physics Lab 1. (1:0:3) F, W Prerequisite: Phscs 123 or concurrent enrollment.

Numerical and symbolic differentiation, integration, and differential equations, using Maple. Applications in mechanics, optics, and special relativity.

250. Introduction to Experimental Physics 2. (1:1:2) F, W, Su Prerequisite: Phscs 220; Phscs 150 or Chem 226; or instructor's consent.

Electronic devices and measurements, transducers, time and frequency response, optical and heat experiments, nonlinear curve fitting, designing computer interfacing applications.

281. Principles of Solid State Physics. (3:3:1) F Prerequisite: Phscs 121, 122.

Introduction to physics of solids, including laboratory experience. For students in science, computer science, technology, and engineering.

313R. Special Topics in Physics. (13:Arr.0 ea.) On dem.

Special topics in physics for undergraduate physics majors.

314. (Phscs-Hist 314-Phil 423) History and Philosophy of Science. (3:3:0) F Prerequisite: PhyS 100 or instructor's consent.

Scientific explanation, concepts, and models. Philosophical assumptions and criteria for theory selection, as exemplified by historical development of basic ideas in science.

318. Introduction to Classical Field Theory. (3:3:0) F, W, Sp Prerequisite: Math 334 or concurrent enrollment.

Classical equations of physical fields; algebra of complex variables; applying Fourier analysis, Fourier transforms, and orthogonal functions.

321. Mechanics. (3:3:0) W, Su Prerequisite: Phscs 121, Math 334 or concurrent enrollment. Recommended: concurrent enrollment in Phscs 330.

Newton's laws applied to particles and systems of particles, including rigid bodies. Conservation principles and Lagrange's and Hamilton's equations.

329. Observational Astronomy. (3:2:4) W Prerequisite: Phscs 227, 228; or instructor's consent.

Basic techniques of observational astronomy, emphasizing practical experience in optical data acquisition and analysis.

330. Computational Physics Lab 2. (1:0:3) W, Su Prerequisite: Phscs 230; 321 or concurrent enrollment; Math 334 or equivalent.

Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, linear algebra and eigenvalues, chaos theory. Applications to dynamics. Introduction to programming in Matlab.

340. Electronics Lab. (1:1:2) F, Sp Prerequisite: Phscs 220.

Introduction to analog and digital circuits.

350. Advanced Experimental Techniques. (3:0:6) W, Su Prerequisite: Phscs 250, 340; or instructor's consent. Recommended: knowledge of a computer programming language.

Vacuum systems, machine shop practice, design and use of digital and analog circuits, design of computer-controlled experiments, Fourier analysis, writing proposals, technical literature.

391R. Seminar in Current Physics. (1:1:0 ea.) F, W on dem.

399R. Academic Internship. (19:Arr.:Arr. ea.) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: both department chair's and cooperative education coordinator's consent.

For students engaged in the cooperative education program.

427, 428. Introduction to Astrophysics. (3:3:0 ea.) 427:F; 428:W Prerequisite: Phscs 227, 228.

Principles and observational techniques of astrophysics.

430. Computational Physics Lab 3. (1:0:3) F, Sp Prerequisite: Phscs 222, 318, 330.

Static and dynamic boundary value problems, partial differential equations. Applications in electrostatics, thermodynamics, waves, and quantum mechanics. Programming with Matlab.

431. Thermal Physics. (3:3:0) F Prerequisite: Phscs 222, Math 212 or 214.

Principles of thermodynamics, with introduction to concepts of kinetic theory and statistical mechanics.

441. Electrostatics and Magnetism. (3:3:0) F, Sp Prerequisite: Phscs 220, 318. Recommended: concurrent enrollment in Phscs 430.

Classical theory of static electric and magnetic fields.

442. Electrodynamics. (3:3:0) W, Su Prerequisite: Phscs 441.

Maxwell's equations, radiation, interaction of electromagnetic fields with matter, and special relativity.

451. Quantum Mechanics. (3:3:0) F Prerequisite: Phscs 222, 318, or equivalent.

Analytical foundations of quantum mechanics.

452. Modern Physics. (3:3:0) W Prerequisite: Phscs 451.

Applications of quantum mechanics to atomic, molecular, statistical, condensed-matter, and nuclear physics; elementary particles.

471. Principles of Optics. (3:3:1) W Prerequisite: Phscs 123, 220. Recommended: Phscs 318, 441.

Electromagnetic wave phenomena, including polarization effects, interference, coherence, dispersion, ray theory, diffraction; introduction to quantum nature of light. Laboratory component emphasizes applications.

492R. Capstone Project in Applied Physics. (13:0:Arr. ea.) F, W, Sp, Su

Senior capstone projects in applied physics. Topic must be approved by department applied physics capstone project coordinator or department chair.

497R. Introduction to Research. (13:0:Arr. ea.) F, W, Sp, Su

498R. Senior Thesis. (13:0:Arr. ea.) F, W, Sp, Su

Individually directed research for seniors. Thesis topic must be cleared by faculty member before registration.

499R. Honors Thesis. (13:0:Arr. ea.) F, W, Sp, Su

500-Level Graduate Courses (available to advanced undergraduates)

512. Computational Physics. (3:2:4) W Prerequisite: Phscs 318, Math 334; or equivalents.

Computational methods for problems that occur in physics research, including ordinary and partial differential equations, nonlinear equations, integration, linear algebra, and signal processing.

513R. Special Topics in Contemporary Physics. (13:3:0 ea.) F, W, Sp, Su on dem. Prerequisite: instructor's consent.

Topics generally related to recent developments in physics.

517, 518. Mathematical Physics. (3:3:0 ea.) 517:F; 518:W Prerequisite: Phscs 318, Math 334.

Topics in modern theoretical physics, including applications of matrix and tensor analysis and linear differential and integral operators.

529. Advanced Observational Astronomy. (3:3:0) On dem. Prerequisite: Phscs 427, 428.

Advanced techniques of observational astronomy, emphasizing knowledge and skills necessary to carry out observational scientific investigation in astronomy.

545. Introduction to Plasma Physics. (3:3:0) F alt. yr. Prerequisite: Phscs 321, 431, 441.

Introduction to plasma physics, including single-particle motion and both fluid and kinetic models of plasma behavior.

546. Plasma Transport. (3:3:0) W alt. yr. Prerequisite: Phscs 545.

Transport processes in plasmas applied to space physics, fusion, and laser plasmas.

561. Fundamentals of Acoustics. (3:3:0) F

Generation, transmission, and reception of sound. Vibrating systems, properties of elastic media, mechanical and electrical energy, and radiation.

562. Applied Acoustics. (3:3:0) W Prerequisite: Phscs 561 or instructor's consent.

Acoustic transducers, spectral analysis, waves in ducts and enclosures, higher-order acoustic sources, fan noise, jet noise, passive noise and vibration control, active noise and vibration control.

565. Acoustics of Music and Speech. (3:3:0) Sp alt. yr. Prerequisite: Phscs 561 or instructor's consent.

Sound production and perception, techniques for analysis and synthesis, computer modeling, machine recognition, ensemble effects.

566. Acoustics of Enclosures and Interacting Structures. (3:3:0) Sp alt. yr. Prerequisite: Phscs 561, 562; or instructor's consent.

Acoustic fields in enclosures, reverberation time, low- and high-modal density fields, sound-structure interaction, transmission through panels, isolation techniques, and advanced noise and vibration control.

570. Atomic Physics. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Phscs 451 or equivalent.

Classical and quantum descriptions of the interaction of light with atoms. Atomic spectroscopy. Applications to lasers and astrophysics.

571. Laser Physics. (3:3:0) F Prerequisite: Phscs 471 or basic understanding of electromagnetic waves and optics.

Laser amplification, cavity design, and control and characterization of temporal and spatial modes. Applications in nonlinear optics and atomic physics.

581. Solid-State Physics. (3:3:0) W Prerequisite: Phscs 222 or equivalent.

Introduction for students in physics, chemistry, geology, and engineering. Phenomena occurring in solids and their related physical concepts.

585. Thin-Film Physics. (3:3:0) W alt. yr. Prerequisite: Phscs 222 or equivalent.

Preparation, characterization, use, and special properties of modern thin films; interdisciplinary treatment. Of interest to students in applied physics and engineering.

591R. Colloquium. (0.5:1:0 ea.) F, W

Required of all graduate students every semester in residence.

597R. Introduction to Research. (0.5:0:1.5 ea.) F, W

One or two research areas to be selected, with 20 hours of participation required each semester.

599R. Academic Internship. (29:Arr.:Arr. ea.) F, W, Sp, Su Prerequisite: department cooperative education coordinator's consent.

Cooperative education internships off campus.

Graduate Courses

For 600- and 700-level courses, see the BYU 20012002 Graduate Catalog.



Physics and Astronomy Faculty

Professors

Allred, David D. (1987) BS, Brigham Young U., 1971; MA, PhD, Princeton U., 1973, 1977.

Berrondo, Manuel (1993) BS, U. of Mexico, 1966; PhD, U. of Upsala, 1969.

Clark, Robert B. (2000) BA, MPhil, PhD, Yale U., 1963, 1966, 1968.

Dibble, William E. (1961) BS, PhD, California Inst. of Technology, 1954, 1960.

Evenson, William E. (1970) BS, Brigham Young U., 1965; PhD, Iowa State U., 1968.

Hatch, Dorian M. (1968) BS, Utah State U., 1962; MA, PhD, State U. of New York, 1965, 1968.

Jones, Steven E. (1985) BS, Brigham Young U., 1973; PhD, Vanderbilt U., 1978.

Knight, Larry V. (1973) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1958, 1959; PhD, Stanford U., 1965.

Mason, Grant W. (1970) BA, Brigham Young U., 1961; PhD, U. of Utah, 1969.

McNamara, D. Harold (1955) BS, PhD, U. of California, Berkeley, 1947, 1950.

Rasband, S. Neil (1972) BA, PhD, U. of Utah, 1964, 1969.

Spencer, Ross L. (1984) BS, Brigham Young U., 1974; MS, PhD, U. of Wisconsin, 1976, 1979.

Stokes, Harold T. (1981) BS, Brigham Young U., 1971; PhD, U. of Utah, 1977.

Taylor, Benjamin J. (1980) BA, PhD, U. of California, Berkeley, 1964, 1969.

Associate Professors

Christensen, Clark G. (1972) BS, Brigham Young U., 1966; PhD, California Inst. of Technology, 1972.

Hart, Grant W. (1985) BS, Brigham Young U., 1977; PhD, U. of Maryland, 1983.

Hess, Bret C. (1994) BS, Brigham Young U., 1982; PhD, Iowa State U., 1988.

Moody, J. Ward (1990) BS, Brigham Young U., 1980; MS, PhD, U. of Michigan, 1984, 1986.

Rees, Lawrence B. (1986) BS, Brigham Young U., 1976; MS, PhD, U. of Maryland, 1979, 1983.

Sommerfeldt, Scott D. (1995) BM, MS, Brigham Young U., 1983, 1986; PhD, Pennsylvania State U., 1989.

Turley, R. Steven (1995) BS, Brigham Young U., 1978; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1984.

VanHuele, Jean-Franois S. (1988) BS, Teacher's Proficiency, PhD, Brussels Free U., Belgium, 1979, 1983, 1987.

Assistant Professors

Bergeson, Scott D. (1998) BS, Brigham Young U., 1990; PhD, U. of Wisconsin, Madison, 1995.

Davis, Robert C. (1998) BS, Brigham Young U., 1989; PhD, U. of Utah 1996.

Hintz, Eric (1998) BS, Case Western Reserve U., 1988; PhD, Brigham Young U., 1995.

Hirschmann, Eric W. (2000) BS, Brigham Young U., 1991; PhD, U. of California, Santa Barbara, 1996.

Leishman, Timothy W. (2000) BA, Brigham Young U., 1990; PhD, Pennsylvania State U., 2000.

Peatross, Justin B. (1995) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1986, 1988; PhD, U. of Rochester, 1993.

Research Physicist

Peterson, Bryan G. (1991) BS, PhD, Brigham Young U., 1978, 1983.

Emeriti

Ballif, Jae R. (1962) BS, Brigham Young U., 1953; MA, PhD, U. of California, Los Angeles, 1961, 1962.

Barnett, J. Dean (1958) BA, PhD, U. of Utah, 1954, 1959.

Decker, Daniel L. (1958) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1953, 1955; PhD, U. of Illinois, 1958.

Dixon, Dwight R. (1959) BS, Utah State U., 1942; PhD, U. of California, Berkeley, 1955.

Dudley, J. Duane (1956) BS, Brigham Young U., 1952; MA, Rice U., 1953; PhD, U. of Utah, 1959.

Gardner, Andrew L. (1964) BS, Utah State U., 1940; PhD, U. of California, Berkeley, 1955.

Gardner, John H. (1949) BS, Utah State U., 1943; MA, PhD, Harvard U., 1947, 1950.

Hansen, H. Kimball (1963) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1957, 1959; PhD, U. of California, Berkeley, 1966.

Harrison, B. Kent (1964) BS, Brigham Young U., 1955; MA, PhD, Princeton U., 1957, 1959.

Jones, Douglas E. (1964) BS, MS, PhD, Brigham Young U., 1957, 1959, 1964.

Merrill, John J. (1971) BS, MS, PhD, California Inst. of Technology, 1955, 1956, 1960.

Nelson, H. Mark (1959) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1953, 1954; PhD, Harvard U., 1960.

Palmer, E. Paul (1966) BA, PhD, U. of Utah, 1952, 1956.

Strong, William J. (1967) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1958, 1959; PhD, Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 1964.

Vanfleet, Howard B. (1960) BS, Brigham Young U., 1955; PhD, U. of Utah, 1961.






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