UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 20012002
Brigham Young University
Back Sociology

   

Vaughn R. A. Call, Chair
894 SWKT, (801) 378-4453

College of Family, Home, and Social Sciences Advisement Center
151 SWKT, (801) 378-3541

Admission to Degree Program

All degree programs in the Department of Sociology are open enrollment. However, special limitations apply for teaching majors.

The Discipline

Sociology explores social life and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. Sociologists study people, their organizations, and their cultures. The organizations include families, tribes, communities, and societies, along with a variety of social, religious, political, and business institutions. The study of culture examines language, beliefs, and knowledge in societies.

Career Opportunities

Sociologists may be involved in the scientific study of deviance, family, minority groups, communities, or any of a variety of other subject areas. Some sociologists conduct surveys or social experiments. Growing numbers apply sociological knowledge in corrections and penology, education, public relations in industry, and regional and community planning. Some study urban or rural settings, and cross-national research is increasing.

One of the primary subject areas in the social sciences, sociology is a broad liberal arts major, rather than a narrow occupational specialty. Students who major in sociology are not trained for a single occupation, but instead they are qualified for a wide range of jobs and graduate programs. Job opportunities are greater for students with skills in research methods and social data analysis.

Graduation Requirements

To receive a bachelor's degree a student must fill three groups of requirements: (1) general education requirements; (2) university requirements; and (3) major requirements.

General Education Requirements

Students should contact their college advisement center for information about general education courses that will also fill major requirements.

Languages of Learning

Precollege Math (zero to one course)
(or Math ACT score of at least 22)
03.0 hours
First-Year Writing (one course) 3.0
Advanced Writing (one course) 3.0
Advanced Languages/Math/Music
(one to four courses)
320.0

Liberal Arts Core

Biological Science (one to two courses) 36.0
Physical Science (one to two courses) 37.0
American Heritage (one to two courses) 36.0
Wellness (one to three courses) 1.52.0
Civilization (two courses) 6.0

Arts and Sciences Electives

Arts and Letters (one course) 3.0
Natural Sciences (one course) 34.0
Social and Behavioral Sciences (one course) 3.0

Note 1: For a complete list of courses that will fill each GE category, see the General Education section of the current class schedule.

Note 2: Additional information about general education requirements can be found in the General Education section of the current class schedule or this catalog.

Minimum University Requirements

Religion 14.0
Residency 30.0
Hours needed to graduate 120.0

Cumulative GPA must be at least 2.0.

Note: See the Graduation section of this catalog for more information.

Major Requirements

Complete the major requirements listed under one of the following undergraduate degree programs.

Undergraduate Programs and Degrees

BS Sociology
Emphasis (optional):
Research and Analysis
BS Sociology Teaching
Minors Sociology (General)
Sociology Teaching

Students should see their college advisement center for help or information concerning the undergraduate programs.

Graduate Programs and Degrees

MS Sociology
PhD Sociology

For more information see the BYU 20012002 Graduate Catalog.



BS Sociology (39 hours*)

Major Requirements

  1. At least 9 hours of sociology major courses must be taken in residence at BYU.

  2. Complete the following core courses with at least a C grade:
    Soc 111, 300, 306, 310, 311, 350.

  3. Complete three courses from the following with at least a C grade:
    Soc 420, 421, 422, 424, 429, 450, 460, 470, 481.

  4. Complete an additional 12 hours of sociology courses with at least a C grade.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



BS Sociology: Research and Analysis Emphasis (41 hours*)

We are in a high-tech era. Information gathering, data analysis, and distribution of information are prerequisites for any informed person, group, or corporate entity. This emphasis gives specific hands-on experience with professional researchers in each of these phases of information utilization.

Major Requirements

  1. At least 9 hours of sociology major courses must be taken in residence at BYU.

  2. Complete the following core courses with at least a C grade:
    Soc 111, 300, 306, 310, 311, 350.

  3. Complete three courses from the following with at least a C grade:
    Soc 420, 421, 422, 424, 429, 450, 460, 470, 481.

  4. Complete the following with at least a C grade:
    Soc 303R, 399R.

  5. Complete one course from the following with at least a C grade:
    Soc 405, 406.

  6. Complete one course from the following with a least a C grade:
    Soc 404, 408.

  7. Complete one additional course within sociology.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



BS Sociology Teaching (81-86 8489 hours,* including licensure hours)

Major Requirements

  1. At least 9 hours of sociology major courses must be taken in residence at BYU.

  2. A teaching minor is required for licensure (approximately 1621 hours).

  3. Complete the following core courses with at least a C grade:
    Soc 111, 300, 306, 310, 311, 350.

  4. Complete three courses from the following with at least a C grade:
    Soc 420, 421, 422, 424, 429, 450, 460, 470, 481.

  5. Complete an additional 12 hours of sociology courses with at least a C grade.

  6. Complete the Professional Education Component (26 29 hours). See the Secondary Education section of this catalog for licensure requirements.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



Minor Sociology (General) (15 hours*)

Minor Requirements

  1. Complete the following:
    Soc 111.

  2. Complete 12 hours from any sociology courses not already completed.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



Minor Sociology Teaching (21 hours*)

Minor Requirements

  1. Complete the following:
    Soc 111, 112, 326.

  2. Complete one course from the following:
    Soc 350, 420.

  3. Complete 9 hours from any sociology courses not already completed.

Recommended Courses

Soc 323, 367, 380, 383, 389, 422.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



Sociology (Soc)

Class Schedule Major Academic Plan (MAP)

Undergraduate Courses

111. Introductory Sociology. (3:3:0) Honors and Independent Study also.

Social group influence; social interaction, processes, organization, and change; family, religion, government, population, culture, race relations.

112. Current Social Problems. (3:3:0) Honors and Independent Study also.

Individual deviance (violence, insanity, drugs, sex, crime, etc.) and social disorganization (poverty, race and sex discrimination, divorce, overpopulation, etc.). Conditions, causes, solutions.

113. Multicultural America. (3:3:0) F, W, Sp, Su

Diverse cultural heritages in the United States. Cultures studied scientifically will include African American, Hispanic, Asian American, and Native American.

211. Family Interaction. (3:3:0)

The family system through life cycle stages; intrafamily processes; stresses and challenges; individual and family well-being; family interaction with societal systems.

300. Methods of Research in Sociology. (3:3:0) Independent Study also. Prerequisite: Soc 111 or equivalent or instructor's consent.

Tools of social research; survey, experimentation, content analysis, secondary analysis, qualitative research, evaluation research, data processing and analysis, and report writing.

303R. Introduction to Social Science and Statistical Packages. (2:2:2 ea.)

Analytical work with social science variables using computer packages such as SAS or SPSSX (see section in current class schedule for designated statistical package). Lab.

306. Applied Social Statistics. (3:3:0) Independent Study also.

Introductory descriptive and inferential statistics; graphing, central tendency, variation, hypothesis testing and parameter estimation, measures of association, correlation, and regression.

310. Development of Sociological Theory. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111, 300, 306.

Contributions of outstanding theorists, such as Durkheim, Weber, Spencer, Marx, Simmel, Cooley, and Mead to development of sociology.

311. Contemporary Sociological Theory. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111.

Introduction and evaluation of current theories of social behavior (why people do what they do).

318. (Soc-MFHD 333) Adolescent Development in the Family and Other Social Contexts. (3:3:0)

Examining developmental and social contexts of adolescents, emphasizing the importance of the family. Other contexts include peers, religion, community, schools, and cross-cultural issues.

323. Racial and Minority-Group Relations. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111.

Social psychological and social structural analysis of racial and ethnic relations; prejudice, discrimination, responses, protests, current issues.

325. Introduction to the Sociology of Religion. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111.

Origin, growth, and organizational development of religious groups; church activity, conversion, secularization, religious change.

326. Sociology of Education. (3:3:0)

Social origins of goals and curricula; theories of change and control; the nature of achievement in education.

327. Sociology of the LDS Church and Its People. (3:3:0)

The LDS Church from a social science perspective, including the Church as a new religious movement; LDS culture; the institutionalization process.

328. Sociology of Sport. (3:3:0)

Analysis of the sociological aspects of sport and their relationship to politics, economics, stratification, education, and family. Focus on concepts, theory, and related research.

329. Medical Sociology. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111 or Psych 111.

Social epidemiology, the sick role, sociocultural definitions of and responses to illness, and the organization of medical-health delivery systems.

335. Social Change and Modernization in Latin America. (3:3:0)

Contemporary changes in the social institutions and cultures as related to the modernization process.

345. World Populations. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111.

Fertility, mortality, and migration patterns of world populations as they relate to current social, economic, political, and religious issues.

350. (Soc-Psych) Introduction to Social Psychology. (3:3:0) Independent Study also.

Conformity and obedience; socialization, norms, roles; attitudes, leadership, group processes.

351. Fundamentals of Self-Image and Self-Esteem. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111.

Social bases and measurement of self-concept. Building positive self-definitions; applications in family, school, and work settings; low self-esteem and deviance.

358. Effective Social Relations. (3:2:2) Prerequisite: Soc 111.

Development and practice of skills in social relations, including giving and receiving feedback, conflict resolution, negotiation and bargaining, and leadership choices.

365. Sociology of Aging. (3:3:0) Independent Study also.

Demographic and social factors related to aging: agencies, serving older citizens, and role of community in solving problems of aged. Required for students in gerontology minor and/or certificate programs.

367. Sociology of Gender. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111.

Gender in social institutions: family, social hierarchies, economics, education, organizations, religion, and science.

370. The Sociology of Urban Life. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111.

Norms, social controls, and social processes in urban areas in both historical and contemporary perspectives.

380. Deviant Behavior and Social Control. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111.

Theory and research related to deviance. Specific topics include psychosis, addiction, homosexuality, violence, and rape, among others.

383. Juvenile Delinquency. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111.

Lawlessness of children and adolescents: causation, treatment, prevention, and outlook.

389. Social Aspects of Mental Health. (3:3:0) Independent Study also. Prerequisite: Soc 111.

Personality disorders and emotional maladjustments that originate in group life; social causation, treatment, and prevention of mental illness.

390R. Special Topics in Contemporary Sociology. (13:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: instructor's consent.

Course content varies from year to year.

398R. People and Cultures Around the World. (13:Arr.:Arr. ea.)

Sociological aspects of societies included in BYU Travel Study tours.

399R. Academic Internship. (19:0:0 ea.) F, W, Sp, Su

Individualized work or volunteer experience in either a research setting or some kind of field placement with an organization.

404. Qualitative Research Methods. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 300.

Purposes, methods, and limitations of qualitative research. Includes participant observation and hermeneutics skills.

405. Multiple Regression Analysis and Social Science Computing. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 306 or instructor's consent.

Data analysis and computer use in sociology; least squares and logistic regression techniques; SPSS and its use in conducting data analysis. Research report required.

406. Intermediate Applied Social Statistics. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 306.

Introduction to structural equation models, analysis of variance and covariance, and factor analysis.

408. Survey Research and Social Measurement. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 300.

Survey research design, measurement, and techniques in the behavioral sciences; research and sampling designs and measurement techniques.

420. Understanding Modern Societies. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111, 300, 306, 311.

Comparative-historical theory and research on the political, economic, social, and cultural processes in the formation, social organization, and future prospects of modern societies.

421. Complex Organizations. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111, 300, 306, 311.

Complex formal organization perspectives. Bureaucracy, management, structure, and change in private and public sectors. Formation, growth, and partitioning of organizational fields. Writing intensive.

422. Social Stratification. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111, 300, 306, 311.

Distributions of money, prestige, and power as they relate to life chances, lifestyle, other social institutions, and social justice.

424. Political Sociology. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111, 300, 306, 311.

Analysis of power and decision-making, political institutions, grass root politics, stratification, and political activity, social movements and revolutions, science/religion and politics. Writing intensive.

429. Theory of Social Change and Modernization. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111, 300, 306, 311.

Social change in contemporary society from diverse theoretical points of view.

445. Population Analysis. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 306.

Availability, use, and interpretation of population data for local, state, and national areas applied to planning and evaluation.

450. The Family and Social Change. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111, 310, 311.

Changing patterns of family-related behaviors, functions, and forms. Demographic, economic, and ideological forces shaping the family.

460. Marriage and Family Interaction. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111.

Advanced appraisal of courtship, marriage relationships, and family interaction. Primarily for majors in sociology, family sciences, and related fields.

470. Sociology of Law. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111, 310, 311.

Law as an institution; influence of law on behavior; relationship between law and institutions; role of law in social change.

481. Crime, Justice, and Corrections. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111.

Nature and extent of criminal behavior; current theory and research related to causes of crime and treatment of criminals.

500-Level Graduate Courses (available to advanced undergraduates)

515. Seminar in Sociological Practice. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 315, 600, 606, 610.

Uses of sociological theory and methods to deal with individual, organizational, and societal problems. Techniques for communicating such knowledge to the nonsociologist.

524. Advanced Political Sociology. (3:3:0)

Social basis of political behavior. Modern theories and research concerning use of power and decision making.

525. Sociology of Religion. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Soc 111, 325, or instructor's consent.

Influences of social factors in the development of various religious systems.

527. Sociology of the LDS Church and Its People. (3:3:0)

An advanced analysis of the LDS Church from a social science perspective, including the Church as a new religious movement; LDS culture; the institutionalization process.

528. Sociology of Rural Communities. (3:3:0) F, W Prerequisite: Soc 311, 370, or instructor's consent.

Review and critique of major theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of community, with a focus on rural communities.

530. Sociology of International Development. (3:3:0)

Major theoretical paradigms of development with strategies and practical application in the international setting.

550. (Soc-MFHD) Contemporary Family Theories. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: MFHD 250, Soc 311, or equivalent.

Introduction to basic micro, macro, and processual approaches to the study of the family; social and political theory on the family; and philosophical issues and assumptions underlying family theory, research, and practice.

561. The Family Institution. (3:3:0)

The family in different societies; problems created by various family systems.

565. The Individual and Family in Later Years. (3:3:0)

Developmental aspects of aging, focusing on the biophysical, cognitive, social, affective, and pathological dimensions in people aged 50 and over.

590R. Special Topics in Sociology. (13:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: instructor's consent.

Course content varies from year to year.

595R. Directed Readings. (13:0:6 ea.)

Individualized reading program supervised by faculty member. Pass/Fail only.

598R. Pro-Seminar. (1:1:0 ea.) F, W

Current developments in sociology including research, proposals, professional meetings, teaching, and finding a job.

Graduate Courses

For 600- and 700-level courses, see the BYU 20012002 Graduate Catalog.



Sociology Faculty

Professors

Bahr, Howard M. (1973) BA, Brigham Young U., 1962; MS, PhD, U. of Texas, Austin, 1964, 1965.

Bahr, Stephen J. (1973) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1968, 1969; PhD, Washington State U., 1972.

Call, Vaughn R. A. (1993) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1970, 1974; PhD, Washington State U., 1977.

Chadwick, Bruce A. (1972) BA, MA, PhD, Washington U., 1964, 1965, 1967.

Cornwall, Marie (1986) BA, U. of Utah, 1971; MS, Brigham Young U., 1977; PhD, U. of Minnesota, 1985.

England, J. Lynn (1970) BA, MA, U. of Utah, 1965, 1967; PhD, U. of Pittsburgh, 1971.

Heaton, Tim B. (1980) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1974, 1975; PhD, U. of Wisconsin, Madison, 1979.

Jacobson, Cardell K. (1981) BS, Brigham Young U., 1966; MA, PhD, U. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1969, 1971.

Johnson, Barry L. (1965) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1963, 1965; PhD, U. of North Carolina, 1977.

Kunz, Phillip R. (1968) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1961, 1962; PhD, U. of Michigan, 1967.

Associate Professors

Brown, Ralph B. (1998) BS, MS, Utah State U., 1986; PhD, U. of Missouri, Columbia, 1992.

Forste, Renata T. (1995) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1984, 1986; PhD, U. of Chicago, 1992.

Hoffmann, John P. (1999) BS, James Madison U., 1984; MS, American U., 1985; PhD, State U. of New York, Albany, 1991; MPh, Emory U., 1994.

Johnson, Richard E. (1976) BS, Brigham Young U., 1971; MA, PhD, U. of Washington, 1972, 1976.

Ward, Carol (1990) BA, MA, North Texas State U., 1973, 1976; PhD, U. of Chicago, 1992.

Assistant Professors

Dufur, Mikaela J. (2000) BA, Brigham Young U., 1994; MA, PhD, Ohio State U., 1996, 2000.

Horne, Christine (2000) BS, Brigham Young U., 1984; JD, Columbia Law School, 1989; MS, PhD, U. of Arizona, 1994, 1997.

Knapp, Stan J. (1995) BA, MS, Brigham Young U., 1987, 1989; PhD, Florida State U., 1996.

Emeriti

Duke, James T. (1963) BA, MA, U. of Utah, 1957, 1958; PhD, U. of California, Los Angeles, 1963.

Larsen, Vernon W. (1952) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1949, 1950; PhD, Cornell U., 1957.

Peterson, Evan T. (1953) BS, MS, Brigham Young U., 1953, 1953; PhD, U. of Michigan, 1959.

Rollins, Boyd C. (1963) BS, Utah State U., 1953; MS, Brigham Young U., 1958; PhD, Cornell U., 1961.

Seggar, John F. (1967) BS, Brigham Young U., 1962; MA, PhD, U. of Kentucky, 1964, 1968.

Smith, Wilford E. (1947) BA, U. of Utah, 1943; MA, Brigham Young U., 1948; PhD, U. of Washington, 1952.

Thomas, Darwin L. (1972) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1962, 1964; PhD, U. of Minnesota, St. Paul, 1968.






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