UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2001–2002
Brigham Young University
Back Spanish and Portuguese

   

J. Halvor Clegg, Chair
4050 JKHB, (801) 378-2837

College of Humanities Advisement Center
3078 JKHB, (801) 378-4789

Admission to Degree Program

All degree programs in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese are open enrollment. However, special limitations apply for teaching and translation majors.

The Discipline

The Spanish and Portuguese romance languages and literatures dominate the Iberian Peninsula, major parts of Africa, and the southern portion of the new world from Mexico to the Magellan Straits. These languages, spoken by over 450 million people in twenty-one countries, provide a wide spectrum of cultural, linguistic, and literary variety. Spanish and Portuguese represent vibrant literature that stands at the forefront of twentieth-century excellence and innovation, a linguist's paradise of dialects, rapid change, and development.

Such breadth—plus some 20 million speakers within the borders of the United States itself—gives multiple opportunities for developing skill in the spoken language, as well as in listening, reading, writing, and translation. Studying the Iberian roots of this large and important part of the population and learning about the people's perception of life also brings greater understanding of their values and their struggle for identity. A Spanish or Portuguese major makes for a demanding, intriguing, and pleasurable experience.

Career Opportunities

The field of teaching has always provided good employment opportunities for Spanish majors. In addition, opportunities for both Spanish and Portuguese have been found in government service (translation, U.S. State Department, CIA, FBI, Border Patrol, Peace Corps, NSA, USIA), business, social work, airlines, banking, etc. Many majors go on to professional schools (law, medicine, dentistry, business, etc.), where a liberal arts background is advised. For employment in fields other than teaching, a strong minor or a second major in the employment area is strongly encouraged. Teaching majors are required to complete a teaching minor.

Graduation Requirements

To receive a bachelor's degree a student must fill three groups of requirements: (1) general education requirements; (2) university requirements; and (3) major requirements.

General Education Requirements

Students should contact their college advisement center for information about general education courses that will also fill major requirements.

Languages of Learning

Precollege Math (zero to one course)
(or Math ACT score of at least 22)
0–3.0 hours
First-Year Writing (one course) 3.0
Advanced Writing (one course) 3.0
Advanced Languages/Math/Music
(one to four courses)
3–20.0

Liberal Arts Core

Biological Science (one to two courses) 3–6.0
Physical Science (one to two courses) 3–7.0
American Heritage (one to two courses) 3–6.0
Wellness (one to three courses) 1.5–2.0
Civilization (two courses) 6.0

Arts and Sciences Electives

Arts and Letters (one course) 3.0
Natural Sciences (one course) 3–4.0
Social and Behavioral Sciences (one course) 3.0

Note 1: For a complete list of courses that will fill each GE category, see the General Education section of the current class schedule.

Note 2: Additional information about general education requirements can be found in the General Education section of the current class schedule or this catalog.

Minimum University Requirements

Religion 14.0
Residency 30.0
Hours needed to graduate 120.0

Cumulative GPA must be at least 2.0.

Note: See the Graduation section of this catalog for more information.

Major Requirements

Complete the major requirements listed under one of the following undergraduate degree programs.

Undergraduate Programs and Degrees

BA Portuguese
BA Spanish
BA Spanish Teaching
BA Spanish Translation
Minors Portuguese
Spanish
Spanish Teaching

Students should see their college advisement center for help or information concerning the undergraduate programs.

Graduate Programs and Degrees

MA Portuguese
MA Spanish
MA Language Acquisition (Spanish and Portuguese)

For more information see the BYU 2001–2002 Graduate Catalog.



General Information

Spanish Resource Center

164 University Parkway Center, (801) 378-8107
E-mail: spanish_resource@email.byu.edu

The Ministry of Education and Culture of Spain, in connection with the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the Center for the Improvement of Teacher Education and Schooling (CITES), operates the Spanish Resource Center (Centro de Recursos). The purpose of the center is to provide an ample supply of books, computer programs, and didactic materials, both printed and audiovisual, related to the teaching of Spanish language and literature. Researchers, professors, students, educational institutions, coordinators, administrators, and in general all those who may be interested in the knowledge and promotion of Spanish are welcome. To increase the prestige of the Spanish language academically as well as socially, the Spanish Resource Center

Foreign Language Student Residence

The Foreign Language Student Residence provides live-in opportunities for students in Spanish and Portuguese. A twenty-four-hour-a-day Spanish or Portuguese rule assures participants intensive use of the language, under the direction of native speakers. See the department secretary at 4050 JKHB for information.

Language Skills Development

A program to improve and monitor all language skills at each level of course work has been developed by the department, and a final oral proficiency examination is required of all graduating seniors. Writing skills in Spanish or Portuguese courses will advance from writing exercises and short messages in 100-level courses to original short themes in 200-level classes. Papers in the language at the 300-level and more extensive research and vocabulary and full control of structures at the 400-level will complete the program.

Minor, Double Major, or Approved Supporting Course Work Required for Spanish or Portuguese Majors

All Spanish and Portuguese majors are required to complete either a minor (from any department in the university), 15 hours of approved supporting course work, or a double major.

Nonteaching majors who do not wish to complete a formal minor may substitute at least 15 hours of courses from among the following related fields: a second modern foreign language (upper-division courses only), Latin, Greek, English (beyond the GE requirement), linguistics, classical civilization, Latin American history or geography, Spanish/Portuguese history or geography, humanities, archaeology of Spain/Portugal or Latin America, comparative literature, or other areas approved by the department chair.
Nonteaching and nontranslation majors also may meet their minor requirement by completing 15 additional hours consisting of elective Spanish/Portuguese courses or (strongly recommended) a combination of Spanish/Portuguese electives and interdisciplinary work. In all cases these courses must form a coherent program and must be preapproved by the department chair.
A double major is an acceptable alternative to a minor.

Foreign Residency

The department strongly recommends that all majors participate in an extended (at least two continuous months) and intensive language and culture experience in a Spanish- or Portuguese-speaking country or area.

A student should complete this requirement by:
  1. Residency abroad (may include a Spanish or Portuguese LDS mission, attendance at a foreign university, an advanced exchange program, or similar intensive foreign residence).
  2. Participating in BYU Study Abroad Programs in Spain, Portugal, or Latin America.
  3. Participating in individual or group-arranged internship programs abroad as approved by the department.

Students unable to participate in one of these programs must spend at least one year (two semesters) in the Foreign Language Student Residence, pledging to use only Spanish or Portuguese within the residence. Prerequisite to this experience is Span/Port 201 or its equivalent; any exceptions must be approved by the department. For further information contact the department secretary or the Foreign Language Student Residence Office (1102 JKHB, [801] 378-3765).

Portuguese

BA Portuguese (48-68 hours minimum*)

Major Requirements

  1. No D credit is allowed in major or minor courses.

  2. At least 15 hours of upper-division major credit must be taken in residence at BYU.

  3. Meet the foreign residency requirement.

  4. Complete a minor (approximately 16–21 hours), second major (approximately 30–60 hours), or supporting course work (15 hours).

    Note: Latin American Studies or Spanish Studies minors: Port 321, 339, 345 or 355, and 441 or 451 meet requirements for both the Portuguese major and the area studies minor. Only one of these courses may be double counted (applied to both the major and the minor). Students wishing to complete a Portuguese major and one of these area studies minors must take an additional 6–9 hours chosen from the approved electives for either major or minor. Consult the department and the advisement center for clarification of the choices available to you.

  5. Complete the following prerequisite courses:
    Port 101, 102, 201, 211R.
      And complete one course from the following:
      Port 202, 302.

      Note: Students with foreign residence experience should take Port 302.

      Note: Prerequisite courses may be waived for those having sufficient proficiency with the language.

  6. Complete the following:
    Port 321, 322, 339, 441, 451.

  7. Complete one course from the following:
    Port 345, 355.

  8. Complete 12 hours from the following:
    Port 326, 329, 345, 355, 439R, 442, 449R, 452, 453, 459R, 480R, 490, 520, 521, 522, 529R.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



Minor Portuguese (18 hours)

Minor Requirements

  1. Complete the following:
    Port 321, 339.

  2. Complete one course from the following:
    Port 345, 355.

  3. Complete one course from the following:
    Port 441, 451.

  4. Complete 6 additional upper-division hours from the courses outlined for the major. Port 302 credit may be applied to the Portuguese minor but is not required.



Portuguese (Port)

Class Schedule Major Academic Plan (MAP)

Undergraduate Courses

101, 102. First-Year Portuguese. (4:5:1 ea.)

Pronunciation, conversation, reading, and fundamentals of grammar. Specific attention to Portuguese as the language of Brazil.

199R. Academic Internship. (1–3:0:0 ea.) Prerequisite: department chair's and cooperative education coordinator's consent.

On-the-job experience evaluated by supervisor and posted on student's transcript.

201. Intermediate Portuguese Reading and Conversation. (4:5:0) Prerequisite: Port 102 or three units of high school Portuguese.

Review of grammar. Reading, writing, conversation.

202. Portuguese Reading and Comprehension. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Port 201.

Fourth-semester class combining grammar and culture. Not for returned missionaries. Culmination of GE Mathematics/Foreign Language requirement.

211R. First-Semester Conversation. (2:2:1 ea.) Prerequisite: Port 102 or equivalent. Recommended: concurrent enrollment in Port 201.

212. Second-Semester Conversation. (2:2:1) Prerequisite: Port 211 or equivalent.

302. Advanced Portuguese Grammar, Reading, and Culture. (3:3:0)

Introduction of culture, literature, and grammatical concerns through reading short stories, novels, and drama in Portuguese. First class for returned missionaries.

Note: Native speakers should take Port 321.

311R. Third-Year Conversation. (2:2:1 ea.) Prerequisite: Port 211 or equivalent.

Tools course to help students improve oral proficiency. Will not count for major or minor.

321, 322. Third-Year Portuguese Grammar and Composition. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Port 202 or 302, plus 16 hours of Portuguese or the equivalent.

326. Portuguese Phonetics and Pronunciation. (3:3:3) Prerequisite: Port 321 or equivalent.

Underlying concepts of Portuguese speech production and applications to pronunciation.

329. Survey of Luso-Brazilian Linguistics. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Port 321 or equivalent.

Introduction to linguistics of Portuguese: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, history of the Portuguese language, philology, dialectology, sociolinguistics, and psycholinguistics.

339. Introduction to Portuguese and Brazilian Literature. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Port 321 or equivalent.

Readings in modern literature; formal literary analysis.

345. Portuguese Civilization. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Port 321 or equivalent.

Culture, history, art, music, and traditions of Portugal.

355. Brazilian Civilization. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Port 321 or equivalent.

Culture, history, art, music, and traditions of Brazil.

395R. Contemporary Culture. (1–3:0:0 ea.) For Study Abroad programs only. Prerequisite: Port 201 or equivalent.

Contemporary Portuguese or Brazilian culture: the people and their customs and institutions.

399R. Academic Internship: Portuguese Language Field Experience. (1–6:0:0 ea.) Prerequisite: program coordinator's consent.

On-the-job experience.

439R. Luso-Brazilian Theatre Production. (3:3:0 ea.)

Theory and practice of dramatic performance. Includes participation in play to be performed during semester.

Note: No more than 3 hours of 439R credit may count toward any degree.

441. Survey of Portuguese Literature. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Port 339 or equivalent.

Literary periods, genres, and great writers of Portugal.

442. Camões. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Port 441 or equivalent.

449R. Special Topics in Portuguese Literature. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Port 441, 451, or equivalent.

Specific topics in Portuguese (Peninsular) literature. Course content will vary each semester to offer optimum exposure to all areas of Portuguese literature.

451. Survey of Brazilian Literature. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Port 339 or equivalent.

Literary periods, genres, and great writers of Brazil.

452. Machado de Assis. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Port 451 or equivalent.

453. Twentieth-Century Brazilian Literature. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Port 441, 451, or equivalent.

459R. Special Topics in Brazilian Literature. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Port 441, 451, or equivalent.

Specific topics in Portuguese (Brazilian) literature. Course content will vary each semester to offer optimum exposure to all areas of Brazilian literature.

480R. Directed Research in Portuguese. (1–3:Arr.:0 ea.) Prerequisite: written proposal subject to department approval. Independent Study only.

Under faculty member's direction, designing and conducting research project covering material not normally presented in regular course work. Research paper required. Total Port 480R credit toward bachelor's degree not to exceed 3 hours.

490. Senior Seminar in Portuguese. (1–3:0:0) Prerequisite: senior standing.

Bibliography, research, and writing of senior thesis. Recommended for students planning graduate studies in Portuguese.

491. Senior Proficiency Evaluation. (0:1:0)

Tool course to meet oral proficiency requirement for all majors. No major or minor credit.

500-Level Graduate Courses (available to advanced undergraduates)

520. Advanced Portuguese Grammar. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Port 321.

Applying contemporary grammatical concepts to problems in Portuguese grammar.

521. Romance Philology. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Port 321.

Comparative study of evolution of Latin into modern romance languages.

522. History of the Portuguese Language. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Port 321.

Linguistic sources that contributed to formation of Portuguese.

529R. Special Topics in Portuguese Linguistics. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Port 321.

Topics from semantics to dialectology to sociolinguistics.

599R. Academic Internship: Portuguese Internship. (1–3:0:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Port 321 and instructor's consent.

For supervised internship credit on BYU Study Abroad programs only.

Graduate Courses

For 600- and 700-level courses, see the BYU 2001–2002 Graduate Catalog.



Spanish

BA Spanish (54-76 hours minimum*)

Major Requirements

  1. No D credit is allowed in major or minor courses.

  2. At least 18 hours of upper-division major credit must be taken in residence at BYU.

  3. Meet the foreign residency requirement.

  4. Complete a minor (approximately 16–21 hours), second major (approximately 30–60 hours), or supporting course work (15 hours).

    Note: Latin American Studies or Spanish Studies minors: Span 321, 339, 345 or 355, and 441 or 451 meet requirements for both the Spanish major and the area studies minor. Only one of these courses may be double counted (applied to both the major and the minor). Studies wishing to complete a Spanish major and one of these area studies minors must take an additional 6–9 hours chosen from the approved electives for either major or minor. Consult the department and the advisement center for clarification of the choices available to you.

  5. Complete the following prerequisite courses:
    Span 101, 102, 201, 211R, 212.
      And complete one course from the following:
      Span 202, 302.

      Note: Students with foreign residence experience usually begin with Span 302.

      Note: Prerequisite courses may be waived for those having sufficient proficiency with the language.

  6. Complete the following:
    Span 321, 322, 339, 441, 451.

  7. Complete one course from the following:
    Span 345, 355.

  8. Complete 18 hours from the following:
      Complete at least one linguistics course from the following:
      Span 326, 329, 421, 423, 425, 429R, 520, 521, 522, 529R.

      Complete at least one literature course from the following:

      Span 440, 443R, 444, 446R, 448R, 449R, 450R, 454R, 455R, 456R, 458R, 459R, 461R.

      Complete four additional courses (12 hours) from the linguistics or literature electives above or from the following (Span 345 and 355 will not double count):

      Span 345, 355, 365, 377, 378, 395R, 438, 439R, 480R, 490.

  9. Complete the following:
    Span 491.
      Note: The Senior Proficiency Evaluation is taken in connection with Span 491. It is expected that Spanish majors will pass with a rating of “advanced plus” or higher.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



BA Spanish Teaching (80-102 hours minimum,* including licensure hours)

This is a limited-enrollment program requiring departmental admissions approval. Please see the college advisement center for information regarding requirements for admission to this major.

Major Requirements

  1. No D credit is allowed in major courses.

  2. At least 18 hours of upper-division major credit must be completed in residence at BYU.

  3. Meet the foreign residency requirement.

  4. Complete an approved teaching minor (approximately 16–21 hours).

  5. Complete the following prerequisite courses:
    Span 101, 102, 201, 211R, 212.
      And complete one course from the following:
      Span 202, 302.

      Note: Students with foreign residence experience usually begin with Span 302.

      Note: These prerequisite courses may be waived for those having sufficient proficiency with the language.

  6. Complete the following:
    Span 321, 322, 326, 339, 345, 355, 377, 378, 441, 451.

    Note: Span 377 and 378 must be taken before student teaching.

  7. Complete 6 hours from the following courses:
    Span 329, 365, 395R, 421, 423, 425, 429R, 438, 439R, 440, 443R, 444, 446R, 448R, 449R, 450R, 454R, 455R, 456R, 458R, 459R, 461R, 480R, 490, 520, 521, 522, 529R.

  8. Complete the following:
    Span 491.

    Note: The Senior Proficiency Evaluation is taken in connection with Span 491. It is expected that Spanish majors will pass with a rating of “advanced plus” or higher.

  9. Complete the Professional Education Component (25–26 hours). See the Secondary Education section of this catalog for licensure requirements.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



BA Spanish Translation (54-76 hours minimum*)

This is a limited-enrollment program requiring departmental admissions approval. Please see the college advisement center for information regarding requirements for admission to this major.

Major Requirements

  1. No D credit is allowed in major courses.

  2. At least 18 hours of upper-division major credit must be completed in residence at BYU.

  3. Meet the foreign residency requirement.

  4. Complete a minor (approximately 16–21 hours), second major (approximately 30–60 hours), or supporting course work (15 hours).

  5. Complete the following prerequisite courses:
    Span 101, 102, 201, 211R, 212.
      And complete one course from the following:
      Span 202, 302.

      Note: Students with foreign residence experience usually begin with Span 302.

      Note: These prerequisite courses may be waived for those having sufficient proficiency with the language.

      Note: Students wishing to major in Spanish translation and interpretation must apply for admission to the program and pass an entrance exam in Spanish and English. Contact the department secretary the first week of February each year to obtain the official date and place of the exam.

      Note: Latin American Studies or Spanish Studies minors: Span 321; 339; 345 or 355; 441; and 451 meet requirements for both the Spanish translation major and the area studies minor. Only one of these courses may be doubly counted (applied for both the major and minor). Students wishing to complete a Spanish major and one of these area studies minors must take an additional 6–9 hours chosen from the approved electives for either major or minor. Consult the department and the advisement center for clarification of the choices available.

  6. Complete the following:
    Span 321, 322, 339, 425, 441, 451.

    Note: Span 321 and 322 must be completed with a grade of B or better.

  7. Complete one course from the following:
    Span 345, 355.

  8. Complete the following courses in sequence:
    Span 415A, 415B, 416A, 416B, 417A, 417B, 418.

      Note: These seven courses require a minimum of a B grade. (Span 322, 425, and either Span 345 or 355 must be taken before Span 415A.)

  9. Complete 3 hours from the following:
      Span 326, 329, 345, 355, 365, 377, 378, 395R, 421, 423, 429R, 438, 439R, 440, 443R, 444, 446R, 448R, 449R, 450R, 454R, 455R, 458R, 459R, 461R, 480R, 520, 521, 522, 529R.

  10. Complete the following:
    Span 491.

      Note: The Senior Proficiency Evaluation is taken in connection with Span 491. It is expected that Spanish majors will pass with a rating of “advanced plus” or higher.

*Hours include courses that may fulfill GE or university requirements.



Minor Spanish (18 hours)

Minor Requirements

  1. Complete the following:
    Span 321, 339.

  2. Complete one course from the following:
    Span 345, 355.

  3. Complete one course from the following:
    Span 441, 451.

  4. Complete 6 hours from upper-division courses outlined for the major. Span 302 credit may be applied to the Spanish minor but is not required.



Minor Spanish Teaching (21 hours)

Minor Requirements

  1. Complete the following:
    Span 321, 326, 339, 377, 378.

      Note: Span 377 and 378 must be taken before student teaching. Span 377 will be waived for students majoring in another language who have had the course in that language. Students who waive the class will need to take 3 additional elective hours from the 300-, 400-, or 500-level courses in Spanish.

  2. Complete one course from the following:
    Span 345, 355.

  3. Complete one course from the following:
    Span 441, 451.

  4. Complete the following:
    Span 491.

      Note: The Senior Proficiency Evaluation is taken in connection with Span 491. It is expected that students will pass with a rating of “advanced plus” or higher.



Spanish (Span)

Class Schedule Major Academic Plan (MAP)

Undergraduate Courses

100A. Introductory Spanish. (2:3:1)

Independent Study also. First semester for those who have had no Spanish and desire maximum time for assimilation.

100B. Second Semester, Introductory Spanish. (2:3:1) Prerequisite: Span 100A.

Continuation of Span 100A.

100C. Third Semester, Introductory Spanish. (2:3:1) Prerequisite: Span 100B.

Continuation of Span 100B.

100D. Fourth Semester, Introductory Spanish. (2:3:1) Prerequisite: Span 100C.

Continuation of Span 100C.

101, 102. First-Year Spanish. (4:5:2 ea.)

For students with little or no previous Spanish. Fundamentals of Spanish, emphasizing communication. (Accelerated sections available for those with more language experience.) Placement exam required.

121. Intensive Reading in Spanish. (4:4:0) For students with little or no Spanish.

Developing reading skills in area of student's specialization. Graduate students will be graded pass/fail; undergraduate students will receive letter grades.

199R. Academic Internship. (1–3:Arr.:Arr. ea.) Prerequisite: department chair's and cooperative education coordinator's consent.

Work experience evaluated by supervisor and posted on student's transcript.

201. Second-Year Spanish. (4:5:1) Independent Study also. Prerequisite: Span 102, three units of high school Spanish, or placement by diagnostic test.

Review of grammar, reading, writing, conversation.

202. Spanish Reading and Comprehension. (3:3:1) Prerequisite: Span 201.

Fourth-semester class introducing culture and grammar through study of literature. Not for returned missionaries.

211R. First-Semester Conversation. (2:2.5:1 ea.) Prerequisite: Span 102 or equivalent. Recommended: concurrent enrollment in Span 201.

212. Second-Semester Conversation. (2:2.5:1) Prerequisite: Span 211 or equivalent. Recommended: concurrent enrollment in Span 201 or 202.

302. Intermediate Spanish Grammar Review, Reading, and Culture. (3:3:0)

Introduction of culture, literature, and grammatical concerns through reading short stories, novels, and drama in Spanish. First class for returned missionaries.

Note: Native speakers should take Span 321.

310. Premajor Skills Review. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Span 202 or equivalent.

Required of students whose scores on a qualifying exam show that they are not prepared for Span 321. Emphasis on grammar, conversation, composition, and listening comprehension.

311R. Spanish Oral Proficiency Preparation. (2:2:1 ea.) Prerequisite: Span 212 or equivalent.

Tools course to help students meet oral proficiency requirements for major and minor. Will not count for major or minor.

321. Third-Year Spanish Grammar and Composition. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Span 202, 302, or equivalent.

Intensive study and practice with Spanish grammar, vocabulary, and writing.

322. Third-Year Writing in Spanish. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Span 321.

Study and practice of different writing styles; developing research skills. Strongly recommended to be taken shortly after Span 321.

326. Spanish Phonetics and Pronunciation. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Span 202, 302, or equivalent.

Spanish sound system; underlying concepts of Spanish speech production and applications to pronunciation.

329. Survey of Hispanic Linguistics. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Span 321 or equivalent.

Introduction to linguistics of Spanish: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, history of the Spanish language, philology, dialectology, sociolinguistics, and psycholinguistics.

339. Introduction to Spanish Literature. (3:3:0) Independent Study also. Prerequisite: Span 202, 302, or equivalent. Course is prerequisite to 400-level literature courses.

Readings in modern Hispanic literatures, focusing on formal literary analysis.

345. Iberian Civilization. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Span 202, 302, or equivalent.

Culture, history, art, music, and traditions of Spain.

355. Ibero-American Civilization. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Span 202, 302, or equivalent.

Culture, history, art, music, and traditions of Spanish America.

365. Mexican-American Culture. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Span 202, 302, or equivalent.

Contemporary culture (education, popular and fine arts, worldview, attitudes, etc.) of the Mexican-American in the U.S.

Note: Prospective teachers should take Span 377 and 378 just before student teaching and after as many upper-division Spanish courses as possible.

Spanish-teaching majors and minors must take both Span 377 and 378.
Prospective student instructors must take Span 377 before employment, but preference will be given to candidates who have taken both Span 377 and 378.

377. Spanish Language Teaching Procedures 1. (3:3:2) Prerequisite: Span 321, 326; 345 or 355; and, for licensure, ScEd 276.

Mastery of skills specific to foreign language instruction with emphasis on skills taught in first-year courses.

378. Spanish Language Teaching Procedures 2. (3:3:2) Prerequisite: Span 377.

Mastery of skills specific to foreign language instruction; emphasizes skills taught in intermediate courses (reading, writing, testing, and nontraditional methodologies).

395R. Contemporary Culture. (1–3:Arr.:Arr. ea.) For Study Abroad programs only. Prerequisite: Span 102 or equivalent.

Contemporary Spanish (or Spanish- American) culture: the people and their customs and institutions.

399R. Academic Internship: Spanish Language Field Experience. (1–6:0:0 ea.) Prerequisite: program coordinator's consent.

On-the-job experience.

415A. Beginning Translation and Interpretation, English to Spanish. (1.5:3:1) F 1st blk. Prerequisite: Span 321, 322, with a B grade or better.

Introduction to history, theory, and principles of translation and interpretation dealing specifically in English to Spanish.

415B. Beginning Translation and Interpretation, Spanish to English. (1.5:3:1) F 2d blk. Prerequisite: Span 415A.

Introduction to history, theory, and principles of translation and interpretation, dealing specifically in Spanish to English.

416A. Intermediate Translation and Interpretation, English to Spanish. (1.5:3:1) W 1st blk. Prerequisite: Span 415B, with a B grade or better.

Systematic study and contrastive exercises in translation and interpretation from English to Spanish. Translation of texts in general conceptual fields.

416B. Intermediate Translation and Interpretation, Spanish to English. (1.5:3:1) W 2d blk. Prerequisite: Span 416A.

Systematic study and contrastive exercises in translation and interpretation from Spanish to English. Translation of texts in general conceptual fields.

417A. Advanced Translation and Interpretation, English to Spanish. (1.5:3:1) F 1st blk. Prerequisite: Span 416B, with a B grade or better.

Translation of texts in specific fields. Simultaneous interpretation. From English to Spanish.

417B. Advanced Translation and Interpretation, Spanish to English. (1.5:3:1) F 2d blk. Prerequisite: Span 417A.

Translation of texts in specific fields. Simultaneous interpretation. From Spanish to English.

418. Translation and Interpretation Project. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Span 417A,B.

Individual translation and/or interpretation projects.

421. Fourth-Year Grammar. (3:3:0) F, W Prerequisite: Span 321, 322.

Fourth-year study of Spanish grammar and usage.

423. Border Spanish. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Span 321 or equivalent.

Mexican-American speech patterns, including language contact and bilingualism. Previous course in linguistics strongly recommended.

425. Contrastive Analysis of the Structures of Spanish and English (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Span 321.

Contrastive analysis of phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics of Spanish and English.

429R. Special Topics in Spanish Linguistics. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Span 326 or 329.

Course content varies yearly; focuses on specific area of linguistics such as dialectology or sociolinguistics.

438. Hispanic Cinema. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Span 339 or equivalent.

Introduction to study of film; background in appreciating best of motion picture art in Spain and Spanish America. Previous experience with film useful but not required.

439R. Hispanic Theatre Production. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: director's consent.

Theory and practice of dramatic performance. Includes participation in play to be performed during semester.

Note: No more than 3 hours of 439R credit may count toward any degree.

440. Medieval Spanish Literature. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Span 441 or equivalent.

Spanish literature from El Cantar de Mió Cid (1140) through La Celestina (1499).

441. Survey of Spanish Literature. (3:3:0) Independent Study also. Prerequisite: Span 339.

Literary masterpieces of Spain.

443R. Golden Age Literature. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Span 441 or equivalent.

Sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Spanish literature.

444. Don Quijote. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: Span 441 or equivalent.

In-depth study of Cervantes' El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha.

446R. Nineteenth-Century Literature. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Span 441 or equivalent.

Romanticism (1770s through 1870s) and/or the novels of Benito Pérez Galdós and his contemporaries.

448R. Twentieth-Century Spanish Literature. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Span 441 or equivalent.

Genre (twentieth-century novel, drama, or poetry) or particular school (Generation of 1898, Generation of 1927, etc.) emphasized.

449R. Special Topics in Spanish Literature. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Span 441 or equivalent.

Specific topics in Spanish (peninsular) literature. Course content will vary each semester to offer optimum exposure to all areas of Spanish literature.

450R. Early Spanish-American Literature. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Span 451 or equivalent.

Indigenous literature (Maya, Nahuatl, etc.) and other texts written in Spanish Colonial America through eighteenth century.

451. Survey of Hispanic-American Literature. (3:3:0) Independent Study also. Prerequisite: Span 339.

Literary masterpieces of Spanish America.

454R. The Spanish American Novel. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Span 451 or equivalent.

Selected Spanish-American novelists such as Juan Rulfo, Gabriel Garciá Márquez, Alejo Carpentier, Mario Vargas-Llosa, etc.

455R. Spanish American Poetry. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Span 451 or equivalent.

Selected Spanish-American poets, movements, and national traditions.

456R. Spanish American Drama. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Span 451 or equivalent.

Twentieth-century theatre from Spanish America and Brazil.

458R. Hispanic-American Short Story. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Span 451 or equivalent.

Introduction and development of an important literary genre in Spanish America, including works of Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Juan Rulfo, Gabriel Garciá Márquez, etc.

459R. Special Topics in Spanish American Literature. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Span 451 or equivalent.

Specific topics in Latin American literature. Course content will vary each semester to offer optimum exposure to all areas of Latin American literature.

461R. Spanish-Speaking American (Mexican-American) Literature. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Span 339 or instructor's consent.

Spanish-English literature of the Mexican-American within the United States.

480R. Directed Research in Spanish. (1–3:Arr.:0 ea.) Prerequisite: written proposal subject to department approval. Independent Study only.

Under faculty member's direction, designing and conducting research project covering material not normally presented in regular course work. Research paper required. Total Span 480R credit toward bachelor's degree not to exceed 3 hours.

490. Senior Seminar in Spanish. (3:3:0) Prerequisite: senior standing.

Bibliography, research, and writing of senior thesis. Recommended for students planning graduate studies in Spanish.

491. Senior Proficiency Evaluation. (0:1:0)

Tool course to meet oral proficiency requirement for all majors and teaching minors. No major or minor credit.

500-Level Graduate Courses (available to advanced undergraduates)

520. Problems in Spanish Grammar. (3:3:0)

Application of contemporary grammatical concepts to problems in Spanish grammar.

521. Romance Philology. (3:3:0)

Comparative study of evolution of Latin into modern romance languages.

522. History of the Spanish Language. (3:3:0)

Linguistic sources that contributed to formation of the Spanish language.

529R. Special Topics in Spanish Linguistics. (3:3:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Span 520, 522.

Topics include semantics, dialectology, and sociolinguistics.

577. Spanish Language Teaching Procedures. (3:3:2) For public school teachers.

Mastery of skills specific to foreign language instruction. Lectures, demonstrations, practical experience.

599R. Academic Internship: Spanish Internship. (1–3:0:0 ea.) Prerequisite: Span 321 and instructor's consent.

For supervised internship credit on BYU Study Abroad programs only.

Graduate Courses

For 600- and 700-level courses, see the BYU 2001–2002 Graduate Catalog.



Spanish and Portuguese Faculty

Professors

Alba, Orlando (1993) BA, U. Católica Madre y Maestra, 1972; MA, U. of Puerto Rico, 1978; PhD, U. Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid, Spain, 1988.

Cluff, Russell M. (1983) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1972, 1974; PhD, U. of Illinois, 1978.

Dennis, Ronald D. (1966) BA, Brigham Young U., 1964; MA, PhD, U. of Wisconsin, Madison, 1965, 1972.

Larson, Jerry W. (1980) BA, Utah State U., 1969; MA, Brigham Young U., 1974; PhD, U. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 1977.

Lund, Christopher C. (1992) BA, Brigham Young U., 1967; MA, PhD, U. of Texas, Austin, 1970, 1974.

Lyon, Thomas E. (Ted) (1972) BA, U. of Utah, 1963; PhD, U. of California, Los Angeles, 1967.

Quackenbush, L. Howard (1970) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1965, 1967; PhD, U. of Illinois, 1970.

Rosenberg, John R. (1985) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1979, 1981; MA, PhD, Cornell U., 1984, 1985.

Williams III, Frederick G. (1999) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1965, 1967; PhD, U. of Wisconsin, 1971.

Associate Professors

Clegg, J. Halvor (1972) BA, Brigham Young U., 1964; MA, PhD, U. of Texas, Austin, 1967, 1969.

Fails, Willis Clark (1981) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1975, 1977; PhD, U. of Texas, Austin, 1984.

Hegstrom, Valerie (1994) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1982, 1986; MA, PhD, U. of Kansas, 1988, 1992.

Jensen, Gordon K. (1969) BA, Brigham Young U., 1963; MA, PhD, U. of Wisconsin, Madison, 1966, 1975.

Labrum, Marian B. (1974) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1972, 1975; PhD, Middlebury Coll., 1988.

Meredith, Robert Alan (1976) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1969, 1974; PhD, Ohio State U., 1976.

Pratt, Dale J. (1994) BA, Brigham Young U., 1990; PhD, Cornell U., 1994.

Sherman, Alvin F., Jr. (1999) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1985, 1987; PhD, U. of Virginia, 1990.

Smead, Robert N. (1998) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1981, 1983; PhD, U. of Texas, Austin, 1988.

Turley, Jeffrey (1989) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1982, 1984; PhD, U. of California, Berkeley, 1992.

Assistant Professors

García, Mara Lucy (1996) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1990, 1992; PhD, U. of Kentucky, 1997.

Laraway, David P. (1998) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1992, 1994; PhD, Cornell U., 1998.

Stallings, Gregory C. (1999) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1989, 1993; PhD, U. of California, Irvine, 1999.

Weatherford, Douglas (1996) BA, Brigham Young U., 1988; PhD, Pennsylvania State U., 1997.

Williams, G. Lynn (2000) BA, PhD, U. of London, England, 1973, 1978.

Associate Lecturer

Hoskisson, Joaquina Valtierra de (1990) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1971, 1974.

Assistant Lecturer

Hague, Daryl R. (1994) BA, Brigham Young U., 1987; JD, U. of Washington, 1990.

Emeriti

Anderson, C. Dixon (1956) BA, Brigham Young U., 1953; MA, PhD, U. of Texas, Austin, 1956, 1965.

Ashworth, Peter P. (1966) AA, Bakersfield Coll., 1952; BA, Brigham Young U., 1962; PhD, U. of Oklahoma, 1967.

Brown, Jack V. (1964) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1957, 1960.

Compton, Merlin D. (1964) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1952, 1954; PhD, U. of California, Los Angeles, 1959.

Dowdle, Harold L. (1968) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1948, 1949; PhD, Stanford U., 1954.

Forster, Merlin H. (1987), H. Darrel Taylor Distinguished Professor of Latin American Literature; BA, Brigham Young U., 1956; MA, PhD, U. of Illinois, 1957, 1960.

Hall, Wendell H. (1966) BA, MA, U. of Utah, 1952, 1953; PhD, Inter-American U., Mexico, 1974.

Jackson, T. Wendell (1968) BA, Brigham Young U., 1956; PhD, Ohio State U., 1968.

Meléndez, Gloria S. (1978) BA, U. of Utah, 1955; PhD, Brigham Young U., 1980.

Moon, H. Kay (1963) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1957, 1959; PhD, Syracuse U., 1963.

Ramsey, Myriam (1975) Dipl, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Brasil, Campinas, Brazil, 1954; BA, MAT, Georgia State U., 1971, 1973; PhD, U. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1975.

Rosen, Harold E. (1963) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1954, 1959; PhD, U. of Oregon, 1966.

Shreeve, Lyman Sidney (1965) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1949, 1951; PhD, Inter-American U., Mexico, 1970.

Taylor, James Scott (1962) BA, MA, Brigham Young U., 1957, 1960; PhD, Ohio State U., 1967.

Valentine, Amy Y. (1970) BA, Brigham Young U., 1946.






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